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ECHO

Abbreviation for enteric cytopathic human orphan. See: ECHO virus.

ech·o

(ek'ō),
1. A reverberating sound sometimes heard during auscultation of the chest.
2. In ultrasonography, the acoustic signal received from scattering or reflecting structures or the corresponding pattern of light on a CRT or ultrasonogram.
3. In magnetic resonance imaging, the signal detected following an inverting pulse.
[G.]

echo

(ek´o) a repeated sound, produced by reverberation of sound waves; also, the reflection of ultrasonic, radio, and radar waves.
amphoric echo  a resonant repetition heard on auscultation of the chest, at an interval after a vocal sound.
metallic echo  a ringing repetition of heart sounds sometimes heard in patients with pneumopericardium or pneumothorax.

echo

[ek′ō]
1 the reflection of an ultrasound wave back to the transducer from a structure in the plane of the sound beam.
2 (informal) echoradiography.

ech·o

(ek'ō)
1. A reverberating sound sometimes heard during auscultation of the chest.
2. ultrasonography The acoustic signal received from scattering or reflecting structures, or the corresponding pattern of light on a CRT or ultrasonogram.
3. magnetic resonance imaging The signal detected following an inverting pulse.
[G.]

ultrasonography 

A technique utilizing high frequency ultrasound waves (greater than 18 000 Hz) emitted by a transducer placed near the eye. The silicone probe, which rests on the eye, is separated from the transducer by a water column to segregate the noise from the transducer. The technique is used to make biometric measurements such as the axial length of the eye, the depth of the anterior chamber, the thickness of the lens, the distance between the back of the lens and the retina, the thickness of the cornea and detect ocular pathology. The ultrasound wave is reflected back when it encounters a change in density (or elasticity) of the medium through which it is passing. The reflected vibration is called an echo. Echoes from the interfaces between the various media of the eye are converted into an electrical potential by a piezoelectrical crystal and can be displayed as deflections or spikes on a cathode-ray oscilloscope.There are two basic techniques used for examination: a contact system (often referred to as applanation) described above in which the probe is in contact with cornea and an immersion system in which the transducer and the cornea are separated by a water bath. This latter method eliminates the risk of indentation of the cornea and underestimation of the anterior chamber depth and axial length. Two types of ultrasonographic measurements are used: (1) The time-amplitude or A-scan which measures the time or distance from the transducer to the interface and back. Thus echoes from surfaces deeper within the eye take longer to return to the transducer for conversion into electrical potential and so they appear further along the time base on the oscilloscope display. The A-scan is useful for the study of the biometric measurements, as well as measurements of intraocular tumour size (e.g. choroidal melanoma) (Fig. U1). (2) The intensity-modulated or B-scan in which various scans are taken through the pupillary area and any change in acoustic impedance is shown as a dot on the oscilloscope screen, and these join up as the transducer moves across a meridian. The B-scan is useful to indicate the position of a retinal or vitreous detachment, or of an intraocular foreign body or a tumour, and for the examination of the orbit. The B-scan is especially useful in the examination of the posterior structures of the eye when opacities prevent ophthalmoscopic examination (e.g. cataract, corneal oedema). Syn. echography. See biometry of the eye; axial length of the eye.
Fig. U1 Histogram of ultrasound reflections (or echoes) in the eye. Echoes from the various boundaries are given against total time, i.e. the time interval from the cornea to the boundary and back to the cornea. The velocity of the ultrasound waves in the eye is approximately 1550 m/s (it is 1641 m/s in the lens and 1532 m/s in the humours). In the above diagram the total time between the cornea and the retina is 32 μs. The length is then equal to 32/2 ✕ 10 −6 ✕ 1550 ✕ 10 3 = 24enlarge picture
Fig. U1 Histogram of ultrasound reflections (or echoes) in the eye. Echoes from the various boundaries are given against total time, i.e. the time interval from the cornea to the boundary and back to the cornea. The velocity of the ultrasound waves in the eye is approximately 1550 m/s (it is 1641 m/s in the lens and 1532 m/s in the humours). In the above diagram the total time between the cornea and the retina is 32 μs. The length is then equal to 32/2 ✕ 10−6 ✕ 1550 ✕ 103 = 24

ech·o

(ek'ō)
1. Reverberating sound sometimes heard during chest auscultation.
2. In ultrasonography, acoustic signal received from scattering or reflecting structures or corresponding pattern of light on a cathose ray tube or ultrasonogram.
3. In magnetic resonance imaging, signal detected following an inverting pulse.
[G.]

echo

a reflected sound; the basis for echocardiography and ultrasonography.

Patient discussion about echo

Q. My mother had a chest pain and she was sent for a TEE. When do you need a TEE and when a normal echo is fine? My mother had a chest pain few weeks ago. we were sure its a heart attack and went to the ER. There the doctors did some tests and she was sent for a (trans thoracic echocardiogram) TEE. I want to know when do you need a TEE and when you can do just a normal echocardiogram because the TEE was very painful for her and we want to know if ther was a better way.

A. The main difference between TEE and normal echo is that in TEE u put the transducer directly in the esophagus. The transducer is the same and the idea is to put it as close as possible to the heart.
As far as I know there are some heart situations the TEE is better for diagnosis that normal echo. Maybe your mom had one of those situations?
I can recommend you to ask the ER doctor. he will probably be able to give a better explanation for his choice

More discussions about echo
References in classic literature ?
But at present one might fancy the house in the early stage of a chancery suit, and that the fruit from that grand double row of walnut-trees on the right hand of the enclosure would fall and rot among the grass, if it were not that we heard the booming bark of dogs echoing from great buildings at the back.
The old man made haste to mount his chariot, and drove out through the inner gateway and under the echoing gatehouse of the outer court.
The oars were now raised from the water, and the boat shot close in to the land, where it lay gently agitated by waves of its own creating, while the young man, first casting a cautious and searching glance around him in every direction, put a small whistle to his mouth, and blew a long, shrill note that rang among the echoing rocks behind the hut.
Soon the cries of the victims slaughtered in the poultry-yard, the hasty steps of Madame Cropole up that little wooden staircase, so narrow and so echoing, the bounding pace of Pittrino, who only that morning was smoking at the door with all the phlegm of a Dutchman; all this communicated something like surprise and agitation to the traveler.
By this time the Indian was far out of reach, and had rejoined his men, and the whole dare-devil band, with the captured horses, scuttled off along the defiles, their red flag flaunting overhead, and the rocks echoing to their whoops and yells, and demoniac laughter.