echoic


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echoic

(ĕ-kō′ik) [ echo + -ic]
1. Pert. to an echo.
2. Pert. to the imitation of a natural sound; onomatopoeic
References in periodicals archive ?
emphasizing the Big Book, echoic reading, repetitive reading, choral reading, and individualized reading.
Those reverberations find in this scene a general counterpart in a particularly rich echoic language enhanced by alliterative consonance, some near alliterative consonance, and normal alliteration.
According to Home and Lowe's (1996) naming account, the emergence of vocal tacts following listener training is a product of unsolicited echoic responses to dictated names during training.
To establish tact and mand verbal operants as part of the language repertoire of a child with only echoic behavior requires the use of transfer of control procedures (Sundberg & Partington, 1998).
Evaluating Stimulus-Stimulus Pairing and Direct Reinforcement in the Establishment of an Echoic Repertoire of Children Diagnosed with Autism.
Williams and Greer (1993) introduced the echoic to mand and the echoic to tact teaching operations for verbal behavior, where the student has to emit a certain number of echoic responses before being presented with opportunities for independent responses, mands or tacts.
Teaching intraverbal behavior to children with autism: A comparison of textual and echoic prompts.
The foregoing examples are identified as mand, tact, echoic, intraverbal, and textual operants, respectively, and, in each instance, the form of the response is the same, yet the environmental conditions (antecedent/consequent stimuli) in which each response would likely be emitted are not at all equivalent.
echoic and tacting skills, but had limited functional communication skills.
The effects of the acquisition of a generalized auditory word match-to-sample repertoire on the echoic repertoire under mand and tact conditions.
James's image is itself echoic of the ubiquitous Wordsworth and "There are in our existence spots of time," the line in Book XII of The Prelude which ushers in an episode of "visionary dreariness" focussing on "a naked pool that lay beneath the hills,/ The beacon on the summit.
Onomatopoeia emphasizes that words make echoic sounds.