echogenic


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echogenic

 [ek″o-jen´ik]
in ultrasonography, giving rise to reflections (echoes) of ultrasound waves.

ech·o·gen·ic

(ek'ō-jen'ik),
Pertaining to a structure or medium (for example, tissue) that has internal echoes. Cf. hypoechoic, hyperechoic, and anechoic, which refer, respectively, to paucity, abundance, and absence of echoes displayed in the image of a structure.

ech·o·gen·ic

(ek'ō-jen'ik)
Pertaining to a structure or medium (e.g., tissue) that is capable of producing echoes. Contrast with the terms hypoechoic, hyperechoic, and anechoic, which refer to the paucity, abundance, and absence of echoes displayed on the image.

echogenic

tissues reflecting ultrasound waves

echogenic

in ultrasonography, giving rise to reflections (echoes) of ultrasound waves; hyperechoic.
References in periodicals archive ?
On US and sonoHSG, endometrial hyperplasia usually appears as a diffusely thickened, echogenic endometrium (Figure 11).
Usually the lesion has an echogenic nodular appearance on ultrasound, while a hypodense nodule on CT scan is common to many conditions.
Key Words: nerve block, ultrasound imaging, echogenic needle
The intradecidual sign of early intrauterine pregnancy was defined as fluid collection with a slightly echogenic rim located adjacent to the central endometrial cavity.
With Enhanced Needle Visualization, I will not need to spend an extra five to ten minutes setting up additional equipment or finding echogenic needles, which streamlines my practice.
The most extra testicular epidermoid cysts appear as hypoechoic masses containing variable echogenic foci.
Available in a complete selection of sizes and styles, the surface of the EZ Shot 2 needle is designed with unique echogenic dimples to ensure it is clearly visible while performing endoscopic ultrasound.
Ultrasound confirmed concentric thickening of the gallbladder wall and intramural cystic spaces with the additional finding of echogenic intramural foci with "comet tail" reverberation artifact (Figure 2).
The gallbladder may appear to lie below its normal anatomic fossa, and may have an echogenic conical structure (representing the twisted pedicle) at the gallbladder neck (7).
Some have suggested modifying second-trimester risk by using ultrasound to look for subtle markers of Down syndrome, such as a thickened nuchal fold, an echogenic focus in the heart, an echogenic bowel, a short femur, and mild pyelectasis.
The catheter's echogenic band allows the catheter tip to be seen more clearly under ultrasound, which can allow for more accurate embryo placement.