ecdysis


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Related to ecdysis: instar

ec·dy·sis

(ek'di-sis),
Desquamation, sloughing, or molting as a necessary phenomenon to permit growth in arthropods and skin renewal in amphibians and reptiles.
[G. ekdysis, shedding]

ecdysis

(ĕk′dĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. ecdy·ses (-sēz′)
The shedding of an outer integument or layer of skin, as by insects, crustaceans, and snakes; molting.

ecdysis

The shedding of the outer layer of the skin. The term is usually applied to the common process occurring during the development of various insects, such as Ophidia and many of the Arthropoda, but is sometimes used as a synonym for EXFOLIATION in humans.

ecdysis

the process of moulting the cuticle in insects, usually in the preadult stage. The old cuticle is split and cast off to reveal a new, soft cuticle underneath; the insect increases in size, often by intake of air, and the new cuticle hardens. Each larval stage is referred to as an INSTAR, so that the first instar is terminated by the first ecdysis, the second instar by the second ecdysis. Ecdysis is initiated by the MOULTING HORMONE.

ecdysis

shedding of the external layers of the skin—only the epidermis participates. Is controlled by the endocrine glands. May be complete or incomplete due usually to poor nutrition. Called also exuviate. See also dysecdysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ecdysis in scorpions: supine behavior and exuvial ultrastructure.
Animals were checked 2-3 times daily for ecdysis to the adult which usually occurred 6-8 days after the nymphs were isolated from the stock population.
During their research on molting, Zitnan and his colleagues found that certain glands expand just before ecdysis and shrink once ecdysis has begun.
Before molting, feeding declines until it stops completely during ecdysis, then feeding begins again during postmolt (Sugumar et al.
67%, occurred during ecdysis, and the body mass at the end of the 2nd stage was not associated with the survival of juveniles.
Among these individuals, none (n = 10) reached the 2nd molt, with mortality occurring between 11 and 30 days after the 1st ecdysis.
Since the data were not normally distributed (Shapiro-Wilks W test), the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis (H test) were used to compare the average period between successive ecdysis and the average growth ratio of the different morphological structures.
The ascorbic acid content was increased because the deficiency of the latter in insects is associated with abnormalities in ecdysis (sclerotization).
This might occur because the calcite layer was not developed properly from available ACC during the time shortly after ecdysis, during the phase that the cuticle provisionally hardens, or it could result from the attack of this layer after it had been formed imperfectly or cracked because of improper development of the more rigid underlying trabecular layer.
It is possible that this egg sac space is vital for the hatching and the survival of the young spiderlings till the first ecdysis.
After ecdysis, lobsters were allowed at least 1 wk for sclerotinization before measurements were taken.
Nymphs were checked daily for ecdysis until they reached the adult stage to determine developmental rate for each instar.