eccentric training

eccentric training

Sports medicine The lengthening of a muscle tendon unit while active, resulting in a negative movement, required under conditions of rapid deceleration; eccentric forces are required to reverse the body's trajectory after a particular athletic move–eg, jumping and throwing
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In addition, no significant differences were detected in any of the apolipoproteins measured, either in response to the antioxidant supplementation or the eccentric training.
The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of an eccentric training program to a concentric training program on the morphological and mechanical properties of the knee extensor muscle-tendon unit in the elderly in an attempt to improve our understanding of the muscular adaptations to resistive exercises in this population.
18) Eccentric training (also known as negative work) is an exercise in which the muscles lengthen during contraction and provide braking and control mechanisms for limb movement.
Eccentric training for the treatment of tendinopathies.
23,24) Furthermore, the technique of eccentric training has been refined to more effectively treat PT.
However, that was a pilot study evaluating the effect of eccentric training and not a randomized study comparing the effects of different treatment regimens.
Petersen J, Thorborg K, Nielsen MB, Budtz-Jorgensen E, Holmich P (2011) Preventive effect of eccentric training on acute hamstring injuries in men's soccer: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.
However, due to the unnatural nature of eccentric training with using isokinetics, as well as the risks associated with supra-maximal loads we should be cautious of inferring practical application from this research.
Calf muscle strength and the amount of pain during activity (recorded on a visual analogue scale) were measured before onset of training and after 12 weeks of eccentric training.
65,69,70) The results of eccentric training from other study groups are less convincing, (63,71) with a 50% to 60% of good outcome after a regimen of eccentric training both in athletic and sedentary patients.
Once that tissue is starting to remodel with eccentric training, then you use the shockwave as an adjunct.