auditory ossicles

(redirected from ear bones)

au·di·to·ry os·si·cles

[TA]
the small bones of the middle ear; they are articulated to form a chain for the transmission of sound from the tympanic membrane to the oval window.

auditory ossicles

Etymology: L, audire + ossiculum, little bone
the malleus, the incus, and the stapes, three small bones in the middle ear that articulate with each other. As the tympanic membrane vibrates, it transmits sound waves through the ossicles to the cochlea.
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Auditory ossicles

auditory ossicles

The 3 diminutive bones of the middle ear. The malleus is attached to the inner face of the tympanic membrane at the manubrium and articulates at its head with the body of the incus; the incus in turn articulates at its lenticular process with the head of the stapes; the stapes is attached at its base by a ligamentous ring to the oval window of the vestibule. Sound waves channelled though the external acoustic canal (auditory duct) to the tympanic membrane are amplified by the auditory ossicles.

The vibrations received at the oval window are passed down the cochlea; the relative movement of the basilar and tectorial membranes leads to deflection of the stereocilia of the hair cells in the organ of Corti, which generates an influx of K+ ions and production of electrical signals that travel via the cochlear nerve to the auditory complex.

au·di·to·ry os·si·cles

(aw'di-tōr-ē os'i-kĕlz) [TA]
The small bones of the middle ear; they are articulated to form a chain for the transmission of sound from the tympanic membrane to the oval window.
Synonym(s): ossicula auditus [TA] , ear bones.

auditory ossicles

The chain of three tiny bone in the middle ear which acts as an impedance transformer, efficiently coupling the relatively large low-impedance movement of the ear drum to the smaller, high-impedance movement of the fluid in the cochlea of the inner ear.

au·di·to·ry os·si·cles

(aw'di-tōr-ē os'i-kĕlz) [TA]
Small bones of middle ear articulated to form a chain for the transmission of sound from the tympanic membrane to the oval window.
Synonym(s): ear bones.

auditory

pertaining to the ear or the sense of hearing.

auditory apparatus
comprises the tympanic membrane, the auditory ossicles that connect the membrane to the oval window to the internal ear, the membranous labyrinth and its contained endolymph, the labyrinth's cochlear duct, the organ of Corti, a specialized sensory epithelium lining the duct, the sensory hair cells of the organ of Corti and the sensory receptors of the auditory nerve that terminate at the base of the hair cells.
auditory bulb
the membranous labyrinth and cochlea.
auditory conditioning signals
sounds used to condition animals to certain procedures or events, such as gathering at the sound of a bell or trumpet, milking to the sound of a radio, whistle signals to a sheep dog.
external auditory meatus
air-filled tubular extension of the auricle leading to the eardrum.
internal auditory meatus
a canal in the petrous temporal bone that accommodates the VIIth and VIIIth cranial nerves.
auditory nerve
the eighth cranial nerve; called also vestibulocochlear nerve and acoustic nerve. See Table 14.
auditory ossicles
the malleus, incus and stapes, the three small bones of the tympanic cavity of the ear. They form a connecting bony system from the tympanic membrane to the oval window that is the opening to the internal ear.
auditory tube
the narrow channel connecting the nasopharynx to the middle ear. See also pharyngotympanic tube.
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