eagle

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Ea·gle

(ē'gĕl),
Harry, U.S. physician and cell biologist, 1905-1992. See: Eagle basal medium, Eagle minimum essential medium.

Ea·gle

(ē'gĕl),
Watt W., 20th-century U.S. otolaryngologist. See: Eagle syndrome.

eagle

raptor bird of the families Falconidae and Accipitridae. Includes the harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja), golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), tawny eagle (Aquila rapax) and bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).
References in periodicals archive ?
Watts also worries that taking bald eagles off the list might reduce scientific interest in the species.
And they note that ESA-mandated protections for prime eagle territory would no longer be in effect.
But we really try to minimize any disturbance to the eagles.
When Bruce Freske sees 20 to 30 eagles winter at the Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge in Kansas, he is not only fascinated, he is impressed.
The National Park Service wants to conduct a feasibility study on re-establishing bald eagles on the northern Channel Islands and creating a long-term restoration plan for Catalina Island.
I love doing it,'' said Williams, who counts the eagles on her own time.
Charity-savvy businesses and private citizens will find that the American Eagle Foundation (AEF) beats key non-profit integrity benchmarks.
The president was joined on a flag-backed platform on the South Lawn of the White House by a 10-year-old bald eagle named Challenger, who flapped his long brown wings and cocked his snowcapped head.
The dramatic jump in the number of nesting pairs of bald eagles in the Lower 48 - from 1,000 in 1978 to 5,290 today - is one of several examples of successful American wildlife conservation efforts.
Fish and Wildlife biologist John Lewis testified in the Gonzales case that ``it is likely that the current bald eagle population would plummet if Native Americans were given unrestricted access to kill bald eagles for ceremonial use of eagle feathers.
Ruley read his winning essay to attendees, which described the Endangered Species Act as a voice for all animals that cannot speak for themselves, and the voice that saved the bald eagle.
Following success in helping restore endangered ospreys to Vermont's skies, CVPS has joined a partnership of state, federal and non-profit agencies working together to build a breeding bald eagle population in Vermont.