e-prescribing


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electronic prescribing

The electronic transmission of drug prescriptions from the doctor’s (or other prescriber’s) computer or smart device to a high-street pharmacy’s computer.

Pros
Replaces paper prescriptions, which can be lost or tampered with, and significantly reduces the errors related to poor handwriting or ambiguous nomenclature. E-prescribing has incorporated intelligent systems which query patient allergies and prior medicines, and flag adverse reactions known to occur with a particular agent and potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions. E-prescribing reduces serious drug errors by up to 86% and shortens hospital stays.

e-prescribing

Therapeutics The use of handheld electronic products to communicate with pharmacies and provide prescribing information

e-prescribing

The use of the Internet and e-mail for prescribing and acquiring medical orders for patients.
References in periodicals archive ?
Electronic prescribing or E-Prescribing (e-Rx) is an electronic transmission of prescriptions from physician to pharmacists using computer and other mobile devices, such as cell phone and tablets.
Meanwhile, the e-prescribing rules changed for long-term and post-acute providers specifically in November 2014, mandating a change to National Council for Prescription Drug Programs (NCPDP) script 10.
For those who aren't already e-prescribing, the decision will be whether to find an inexpensive e-prescribing program and submit the information necessary to avoid the penalty, or to invest in the transition to a full-scale electronic health record (EHR) system.
Thanks to Meaningful Use incentives," virtually all prescribers (and sometimes, the organizations that employ them) may benefit from government-administered incentive payments as "eligible providers" when they adopt e-Prescribing as part of purchasing, implementing, and "meaningfully using" a complete, "certified" electronic health records system (EHR) according to evolving technology standards from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology.
To assess the effects of e-prescribing on medication errors, the authors looked at the number and severity of prescribing errors - such as ordering a medication but omitting the quantity, prescribing a drug to a patient with a known allergy to the active ingredient and injuries from medication - in 12 community-based medical practices in the Hudson Valley region of New York.
In 2007, 35 million prescription transactions were routed electronically in the United States, according to e-prescribing services network provider SureScripts.
An eligible professional does not have to enroll in order to participate in the E-Prescribing Incentive Program.
Several states are rapidly expanding their e-prescribing initiatives in their Medicaid programs to save costs and reduce errors.
Today, at most, 20 percent of physicians are using e-Prescribing in their practices.
Merritt: Providers Should Use E-prescribing to Reduce Medication Errors