dystrophic calcification


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calcification

 [kal″sĭ-fĭ-ka´shun]
the deposit of calcium salts, mostly calcium phosphate, in body tissues. The normal absorption of calcium is facilitated by parathyroid hormone and by vitamin D. When there are increased amounts of parathyroid hormone in the blood (as in hyperparathyroidism), there is deposition of calcium in the alveoli of the lungs, the renal tubules, the thyroid gland, the gastric mucosa, and the arterial walls. Normally calcium is deposited in the bone matrix to insure stability and strength of the bone and in growing teeth.
dystrophic calcification the deposition of calcium in abnormal tissue, such as scar tissue or atherosclerotic plaques, without abnormalities of blood calcium.
eggshell calcification deposition of a thin layer of calcium around a thoracic lymph node, often seen in silicosis.

dys·tro·phic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

calcification occurring in degenerated or necrotic tissue, as in hyalinized scars, degenerated foci in leiomyomas, and caseous nodules.

dystrophic calcification

Etymology: Gk, dys + trophe, nourishment; L, calx, lime, facere, to make
1 the pathological accumulation of calcium salts in necrotic or degenerated tissues. Compare metastatic calcification.
2 severe dental caries that are promoted by the sugars, acids, viscosity of liquids, and sometimes Streptococcus mutans in a bottle of milk or juice left in contact with a child's primary teeth. This can also occur from contact with breast milk left in a sleeping child's mouth. The condition is preventable; no child should be permitted to fall asleep nursing on any liquid other than plain water. Also called bottle mouth caries.

dystrophic calcification

The combination of fat necrosis and caseating necrosis, resulting in the focal deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in previously damaged tissues–eg, heart valves, scars, foci of TB and atherosclerotic blood vessels–arising in mitochondria, calcification in hyperparathyroidism which develops in the basement membrane of the renal tubules; DC may occur without hypercalcemia or defects of calcium metabolism

dys·tro·phic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(dis-trō'fik kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
Calcification occurring in degenerated or necrotic tissue, as in hyalinized scars, degenerated foci in leiomyomas, and caseous nodules.

dys·tro·phic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(dis-trō'fik kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
Calcification occurring in degenerated or necrotic tissue, as in hyalinized scars, degenerated foci in leiomyomas, and caseous nodules.

calcification

the deposit of calcium salts in a tissue. The normal absorption of calcium is facilitated by parathyroid hormone and by vitamin D. In poisoning with calcinogenic glycosides and when there are increased amounts of parathyroid hormone in the blood (as in hyperparathyroidism), there is deposition of calcium in the soft tissue. (In hyperparathyroidism secondary to renal disease there is deposition in the alveoli of the lungs, the renal tubules, beneath the parietal pleura, the gastric mucosa, and the arterial walls.) Normally calcium is deposited in the bone matrix to insure stability and strength of the bone. In osteomalacia there is an excess of unmineralized osteoid because the aged well-mineralized bone is replaced by a matrix that is inadequately mineralized.

dystrophic calcification
the deposition of calcium in abnormal tissue without abnormalities of blood calcium.
metastatic calcification
deposition of calcium in tissues as a result of abnormalities of calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood and tissue fluids.
nutritional calcification
calcification in soft tissues as a result of an increased intake of calcium.
soft tissue calcification
see metastatic calcification (above), dystrophic calcification (above).

dystrophic

pertaining to or emanating from dystrophia.

dystrophic calcification
mineralization of soft tissues can occur in hyperadrenocorticism, vitamin d toxicity, and hypervitaminosis A. See also calcification.
References in periodicals archive ?
2b: Hemosiderin-laden macrophages and dystrophic calcification.
Dystrophic calcification occurs when calcium is deposited in damaged tissue in a patient with normal serum calcium and phosphate levels.
In light of the patient's clinical history of malignant soft tissue sarcoma, a diagnosis of metastatic monophasic spindle cell synovial sarcoma with dystrophic calcification is more appropriate in the case described here.
Microscopically, the cystic wall was irregularly thickened and fibrotic, with foci of dystrophic calcification and ossification (Fig.
Both abrupt and gradual transitions of the basaloid cells to squamous and ghost cells were seen, along with areas of dystrophic calcification.
These pseudotumors usually originate in the soft tissues of the extremities, and they exhibit extensive concentric psammomatous or dystrophic calcifications.

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