dysthymia


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dysthymic disorder

 
a chronic mood disorder characterized by depressed feeling (sad, blue, low), loss of interest or pleasure in one's usual activities, and other symptoms typical of depression but tending to be longer in duration and less severe than in major depressive disorder.

dys·thy·mi·a

(dis-thī'mē-ă),
A chronic mood disorder manifested as depression for most of the day, more days than not, accompanied by some of the following symptoms: poor appetite or overeating, insomnia or hypersomnia, low energy or fatigue, low self-esteem, poor concentration, difficulty making decisions, and feelings of hopelessness. See: mood disorders, endogenous depression, exogenous depression.
[dys- + G. thymos, mind, emotion]

dysthymia

/dys·thy·mia/ (-thi´me-ah) dysthymic disorder.

dysthymia

(dĭs-thī′mē-ə)
n.
A mood disorder characterized by depressive symptoms that persist for two or more years, sometimes subsiding for short periods of time. Also called persistent depressive disorder.

dys·thy′mic adj.

dysthymia

[disthim′ē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + thymos, mind
a form of chronic unipolar depression that tends to occur in elderly persons with debilitating physical disorders, multiple interpersonal losses, and chronic marital difficulties. Several depressive episodes may merge into a low-grade chronic depressive state.

dys·thy·mi·a

(dis-thī'mē-ă)
A chronic mood disorder manifested as depression for most of the day, more days than not, accompanied by some of the following symptoms: poor appetite or overeating, insomnia or hypersomnia, low energy or fatigue, low self-esteem, poor concentration, difficulty making decisions, and feelings of hopelessness.
See: endogenous depression, exogenous depression
[dys- + G. thymos, mind, emotion]

dysthymia

A degree of depression not amounting to a severe psychosis.

dysthymia (dis·thīˑ·mē·),

n a chronic form of a depressive disorder, symptoms of which are not as severe as other types of depressive disorders. An individual must present with feelings of depression on a daily basis for a period of at least two years to be diagnosed with this condition. At least three of the following symptoms must also be indicated over the same period of time: fatigue, low self-esteem, pessimistic attitude, a noninterest in typical activities, decreased concentration, irritability, decreased productivity, and excessive guilt. A full criteria for diagnosis is available in the
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or
DSM-IV. Counseling, lifestyle changes, nutritional supplements, and botanical medicines may lessen symptoms associated with this condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
What are some of the ways that dysthymia can manifest itself?
This study aimed to elucidate the role of some relevant psychological variables in clinical response and attendance in the naturalistic treatment of dysthymia.
Because dysthymia is a disease that often begins during adolescence (3), patients between 16 and 71 (mean 37.
fluoxetine in patients with dysthymia or major depression in partial remission: a double-blind, comparative study.
Dysthymia (chronic, low-grade depression) is marked by the same symptoms as major depression but is not usually accompanied by changes in appetite or sexual drive, and severe agitation, sedentary behavior and suicidal thoughts are not usually present.
EEG sleep characteristics in dysthymia and major depressive disorder.
Many children with explosive outbursts have depression and dysthymia, or PTSD," or some other exclusionary problem, or don't meet all of the DMDD requirements.
Things are a lot trickier when we face cases of dysthymia that used to be attributed to masked depression (Guzikov, Zobnev, and Revzin, 1999; Bukstein, Brent, and Kaminer, 1989).
I looked up my symptoms and I think I could be at high risk of dysthymia, a kind of long-drawn-out depression.
I looked up my symptoms and I could be at high risk of dysthymia, a kind of long, drawn-out depression.
The point is, dysthymia is presented in the brain; it's not in the "mind" of the patient," Dr.