dysthymia


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dysthymic disorder

 
a chronic mood disorder characterized by depressed feeling (sad, blue, low), loss of interest or pleasure in one's usual activities, and other symptoms typical of depression but tending to be longer in duration and less severe than in major depressive disorder.

dys·thy·mi·a

(dis-thī'mē-ă),
A chronic mood disorder manifested as depression for most of the day, more days than not, accompanied by some of the following symptoms: poor appetite or overeating, insomnia or hypersomnia, low energy or fatigue, low self-esteem, poor concentration, difficulty making decisions, and feelings of hopelessness. See: mood disorders, endogenous depression, exogenous depression.
[dys- + G. thymos, mind, emotion]

dysthymia

/dys·thy·mia/ (-thi´me-ah) dysthymic disorder.

dysthymia

(dĭs-thī′mē-ə)
n.
A mood disorder characterized by depressive symptoms that persist for two or more years, sometimes subsiding for short periods of time. Also called persistent depressive disorder.

dys·thy′mic adj.

dysthymia

[disthim′ē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + thymos, mind
a form of chronic unipolar depression that tends to occur in elderly persons with debilitating physical disorders, multiple interpersonal losses, and chronic marital difficulties. Several depressive episodes may merge into a low-grade chronic depressive state.

dys·thy·mi·a

(dis-thī'mē-ă)
A chronic mood disorder manifested as depression for most of the day, more days than not, accompanied by some of the following symptoms: poor appetite or overeating, insomnia or hypersomnia, low energy or fatigue, low self-esteem, poor concentration, difficulty making decisions, and feelings of hopelessness.
See: endogenous depression, exogenous depression
[dys- + G. thymos, mind, emotion]

dysthymia

A degree of depression not amounting to a severe psychosis.

dysthymia (dis·thīˑ·mē·),

n a chronic form of a depressive disorder, symptoms of which are not as severe as other types of depressive disorders. An individual must present with feelings of depression on a daily basis for a period of at least two years to be diagnosed with this condition. At least three of the following symptoms must also be indicated over the same period of time: fatigue, low self-esteem, pessimistic attitude, a noninterest in typical activities, decreased concentration, irritability, decreased productivity, and excessive guilt. A full criteria for diagnosis is available in the
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or
DSM-IV. Counseling, lifestyle changes, nutritional supplements, and botanical medicines may lessen symptoms associated with this condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
1) Anxiety, a chronic low mood such as is seen in dysthymia and poor concentration and irritability as part of ADHD may mimic a depressed mood.
How to cope when a loved one is depressed, suicidal, or manic Like a pebble thrown into a pond, depression, dysthymia, and bipolar disorder create ripples that spread far from their immediate point of impact.
Dysthymia has not been studied as extensively as major depression, but treatment is generally the same.
While the cause of dysthymia remains a mystery, there is a hereditary element--and women are twice as susceptible as men are--as there is with major depression.
Keywords: depression, women, major depression, dysthymia, postpartum depression, premenstrual, dysphoric disorder, seasonal affective disorder, sad, bipolar disorder, bipolar
Methods: One hundred and fifty patients, 25-70 years old, meeting ICD-10 criteria for mild or moderately severe depressed episodes or with dysthymia, and having a 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale for Depression (HAM-D) total score between 7 and 17, were randomly assigned to an extract.
Another of the ways in which this study claims to distinguish itself from some of its predecessors is in its use of "current psychological research on major depressive episodes and dysthymia to analyze Bunyan.
Problem gamblers have been identified as being at increased risk of dysthymia, major depression, antisocial personality disorder, phobias and chemical dependency.
Incidence of major depressive disorder and dysthymia in young adolescents.
A manual-based therapy programme for the treatment of unipolar major depression as well as dysthymia was developed and the effectiveness thereof was empirically tested in order to address the lack of such a programme in practice.
The existence of any one of the symptoms indicates the presence of dysthymia.
The data showed that 2,626 of those had no depression, 301 had major depression, and 121 had chronic low-level depression, called dysthymia.