dysrhythmia

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dysrhythmia

 [dis-rith´me-ah]
disturbance of rhythm, such as of brain waves or the heartbeat.
cerebral dysrhythmia (electroencephalographic dysrhythmia) disturbance or irregularity in the rhythm of the brain waves as recorded by electroencephalography.

dys·rhyth·mi·a

(dis-ridh'mē-ă),
Defective rhythm. See also entries under rhythm Compare: arrhythmia.
[dys- + G. rhythmos, rhythm]

dysrhythmia

/dys·rhyth·mia/ (dis-rith´me-ah)
1. disturbance of rhythm.
2. an abnormal cardiac rhythm; the term arrhythmia is usually used, even for abnormal but regular rhythms.dysrhyth´mic

cerebral dysrhythmia , electroencephalographic dysrhythmia a disturbance or irregularity in the rhythm of the brain waves as recorded by electroencephalography.

dysrhythmia

(dĭs-rĭth′mē-ə)
n.
An abnormality in an otherwise normal rhythmic pattern, as of brain waves being recorded by an electroencephalograph.

dysrhythmia

[disrith′mē·ə]
any disturbance or abnormality in a normal rhythmic pattern, specifically, irregularity in the brain waves or cadence of speech. Compare arrhythmia.

dys·rhyth·mi·a

(dis-ridh'mē-ă)
Defective (abnormal) rhythm.
Compare: arrhythmia
[dys- + G. rhythmos, rhythm]

dysrhythmia

Any irregularity or disturbance of a normal body rhythm. The term is most commonly applied to the heart beat or the ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM (EEG).

Arrhythmia or dysrhythmia

Abnormal rhythm in hearts that contract in an irregular way.
Mentioned in: Electrocardiography

dysrhythmia

abnormal timing and coupling of movements during gait; characteristic of cerebellar disease (see Table 1)
Table 1: Characteristic limb effects of cerebellar lesions
CharacteristicMuscular effects
DyssynergyMuscular decomposition
Accessory muscles used to achieve voluntary movements
Wide arc movements and past pointing
Aesthenia
Hyporeflexia
DysrhythmiaAbnormal timing and coupling of voluntary movements
Abnormal timing and coupling of voluntary movements during gait
DysmetriaThe loss of ability to gauge distance and speed, and strength and velocity of voluntary movement
The loss of ability to gauge distance and speed, and strength and velocity of voluntary movement during gait
Abnormal gaitUncoordinated ataxic gait
Wide-based gait
Slow, jerky, irregular cadence
Variation of stride length and foot placement from step to step, often with loss of balance
'Double tap' foot sounds, where foot contact occurs audibly in two phases: heel strike and toe contact
Constant postural adjustment

dys·rhyth·mi·a

(dis-ridh'mē-ă)
Defective rhythm.
[dys- + G. rhythmos, rhythm]

dysrhythmia

disturbance of rhythm.
References in periodicals archive ?
The person with HF experiences tachycardia and dysrhythmias as a result.
As scorpion venom induces autonomic nervous system instability, patients with serious envenoming should be closely monitored for the development of cardiac dysrhythmias, severe hypertension or hypotension.
Secondary outcomes included the amount of potassium chloride administered, incidence of plasma potassium concentration outside the normal range and incidence of dysrhythmias or other adverse events (for example, cardiac arrest).
Prior to the analysis, outcomes of interest were defined through ICD-9-CM codes for asthma (493), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (491-492), pneumonia and acute bronchitis (481, 482, 485, 486, and 466), upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) (465), heart failure (428), cardiac dysrhythmia (427), and myocardial infarction (410, 411.
Metabolic Alkalosis - Clinical Manifestations cardiac dysrhythmias seizures; confusion; muscle twitching, agitation >pH;>HC03; normal PaCo2 or elevated if compensation occurs
PROCEDURE Prior to the experiential learning lab activity, which included HFS-enhanced cardiac case scenarios, students attended a lecture on acute coronary syndrome and dysrhythmia.
Preexisting comorbidities (presence or absence) included ischemic heart disease, previous myocardial infarction, vascular disease, cerebrovascular accident, dysrhythmias, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and/or acute/chronic renal failure; preoperative HgbA1C is the amount of glycosylated hemoglobin present in the body recorded as a percentage (normal HgbA1C = 4.
Beta-blockers, such as atenolol (Tenormin) and propranolol (Inderal), are used to treat hypertension, cardiac dysrhythmias and angina, as well as migraine and essential tremor.
Tilton writes that apnea "has significant safety implications because it can cause excessive daytime sleepiness, cognitive impairment, cardiac dysrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, personality disturbances, and hypertension, to cite just a few.
Defibrillators: electrical devices that deliver therapeutic levels of energy to the heart muscle for the treatment of ventricular defibrillation, cardiac dysrhythmias, and pulseless ventricular tachycardia.