dysrhythmia


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dysrhythmia

 [dis-rith´me-ah]
disturbance of rhythm, such as of brain waves or the heartbeat.
cerebral dysrhythmia (electroencephalographic dysrhythmia) disturbance or irregularity in the rhythm of the brain waves as recorded by electroencephalography.

dys·rhyth·mi·a

(dis-ridh'mē-ă),
Defective rhythm. See also entries under rhythm Compare: arrhythmia.
[dys- + G. rhythmos, rhythm]

dysrhythmia

/dys·rhyth·mia/ (dis-rith´me-ah)
1. disturbance of rhythm.
2. an abnormal cardiac rhythm; the term arrhythmia is usually used, even for abnormal but regular rhythms.dysrhyth´mic

cerebral dysrhythmia , electroencephalographic dysrhythmia a disturbance or irregularity in the rhythm of the brain waves as recorded by electroencephalography.

dysrhythmia

(dĭs-rĭth′mē-ə)
n.
An abnormality in an otherwise normal rhythmic pattern, as of brain waves being recorded by an electroencephalograph.

dysrhythmia

[disrith′mē·ə]
any disturbance or abnormality in a normal rhythmic pattern, specifically, irregularity in the brain waves or cadence of speech. Compare arrhythmia.

dys·rhyth·mi·a

(dis-ridh'mē-ă)
Defective (abnormal) rhythm.
Compare: arrhythmia
[dys- + G. rhythmos, rhythm]

dysrhythmia

Any irregularity or disturbance of a normal body rhythm. The term is most commonly applied to the heart beat or the ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM (EEG).

Arrhythmia or dysrhythmia

Abnormal rhythm in hearts that contract in an irregular way.
Mentioned in: Electrocardiography

dysrhythmia

abnormal timing and coupling of movements during gait; characteristic of cerebellar disease (see Table 1)
Table 1: Characteristic limb effects of cerebellar lesions
CharacteristicMuscular effects
DyssynergyMuscular decomposition
Accessory muscles used to achieve voluntary movements
Wide arc movements and past pointing
Aesthenia
Hyporeflexia
DysrhythmiaAbnormal timing and coupling of voluntary movements
Abnormal timing and coupling of voluntary movements during gait
DysmetriaThe loss of ability to gauge distance and speed, and strength and velocity of voluntary movement
The loss of ability to gauge distance and speed, and strength and velocity of voluntary movement during gait
Abnormal gaitUncoordinated ataxic gait
Wide-based gait
Slow, jerky, irregular cadence
Variation of stride length and foot placement from step to step, often with loss of balance
'Double tap' foot sounds, where foot contact occurs audibly in two phases: heel strike and toe contact
Constant postural adjustment

dys·rhyth·mi·a

(dis-ridh'mē-ă)
Defective rhythm.
[dys- + G. rhythmos, rhythm]

dysrhythmia

disturbance of rhythm.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, males have a 23% increased risk of hospitalization for cardiac dysrhythmias compared with women.
The elements of the electronystagmographic findings that suggested a possible central origin of the dizziness were (1) the left-beating nystagmus with a left ear origin and (2) the dysrhythmia of the nystagmus on positional testing and to some degree on caloric testing.
Given limited data on both these published variables and lack of any comparative studies, we undertook a pilot study to compare FTc, BNP and central venous pressure (CVP) as predictors of fluid responsiveness in septic shock patients without cardiac dysrhythmia.
Such dispersion in repolarization of greater than ~80 msec is known to result in dysrhythmias and ventricular tachycardia (10,12).
Prokinetic agents increase antral contractility, correct gastric dysrhythmias, improve antroduodenal coordination and are used to treat the symptoms of gastroparesis.
Methadone can cause repolarization abnormalities, with prolongation of the QT segment and a risk of a particular ventricular dysrhythmia called torsade de pointes.
Dr Richard Knights who conducted the post mortem, said he had died from acute cardiac dysrhythmia and that chronic alcoholism had caused this.
However, the consistency of plasma potassium level maintenance, lesser incidence of hypokalaemia by comparison to control patients, and absence of dysrhythmia or other adverse event establish its safety profile and utility for further study.
Individuals with a previously known cardiac dysrhythmia or artificial pacemaker were excluded.
The court heard Mr MacCormac died from drowning as a result of cardiac dysrhythmia, an irregular heartbeat caused by his blocked artery.
The court heard Stuart died from drowning as a result of cardiac dysrhythmia, an irregular heartbeat caused by his blocked artery.
The defence argued that the test which detected the toxin in Autumn's blood was easily discredited and suggested she could have died from a sudden heart dysrhythmia.