dysraphism

dysraphism

 [dis-rāf´iz'm]
incomplete closure of a raphe; defective fusion, particularly of the neural tube; see also neural tube defect.

dys·ra·phism

, dysraphia (dis'ră-fizm, dis-raf'ē-ă),
Defective fusion, especially of the neural folds, resulting in status dysraphicus or neural tube defect.
[dys- + G. rhaphē, suture]

dysraphism

/dys·ra·phism/ (dis-rāf´izm) [dys- +raphe +-ia ] incomplete closure of a raphe; defective fusion, particularly of the neural tube. See also neural tube defect.

dys·ra·phism

, dysraphia (dis'ră-fizm, -raf'ē-ă)
Defective fusion, especially of the neural folds, resulting in status dysraphicus or neural tube defect.
[dys- + G. rhaphē, suture]

dysraphism

defective spinal cord fusion; characteristic of spina bifida

dysraphism

incomplete closure of a raphe, e.g. of the neural tube. The defect may be complete or partial.

spinal dysraphism
an inherited defect in Weimaraner dogs and reported in many other breeds. From an early age, affected puppies show varying degrees of 'bunny hopping', symmetrical and simultaneous use of the back legs, often overextending them before stepping forward. More severe defects have associated musculoskeletal abnormalities and may be a cause of perinatal death.
sternal dysraphism
congenital split of the sternum; may be associated with peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Part 3: examination of the newborn with closed spinal dysraphism.
18) Epidermoids may be primary or, as is more common in children, iatrogenic secondary to inadvertent inclusion of skin debris during surgical intervention, such as repair of spinal dysraphism.
Kyphotic deformity develops at the site of the spinal dysraphism as a result of the lateralised erector spinae muscles becoming perverted flexors of the spine.
Physical examination should focus on inspection for cutaneous lesions, trauma, prior surgery and signs of spinal dysraphism.
Anterior encephalocele are associated with hypertelorism, midline craniofacial dysraphism, agenesis of corpus callosum, lipoma and subependymal heterotopias.
Midline lumbosacral IH can be associated with spinal dysraphism.
Treatment of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in infants and children with neurospinal dysraphism with clean intermittent (self) catheterisation and optimized intravesical oxybutynin hydrochloride therapy.
Occult Spinal Dysraphism (Tethered Cord, Diastematomyelia and Spinal Lipoma).
SCM is a rare form of spinal dysraphism which occurs as a result of the foetus having an accessory neurenteric canal.
Key Words: neural tube defect, spinal dysraphism, epidural analgesia, spina bifida, obstetric analgesia
Contributors cover such topics as clinical assessments of newborns, infants and older children, diagnostic imaging, including basic concepts for interpreting CT and MRI studies, detecting trauma and child abuse, and diagnosing brain tumors, neurotrauma of the craniocerebral, spinal and brachial regions, neonatal neurosurgery, hydrocephalus, generic syndromes and congenital abnormalities, spinal dysraphism, craniofacial surgery, functional neurosurgery in the child, anesthetic considerations, cerebrovascular disease, infections and bedside procedures.
Spinal dysraphism from T10 to S2 with widened interpediculate distance and lack of fusion of posterior elements, and