dysproteinemia

dysproteinemia

 [dis-pro″tēn-e´me-ah]
1. disorder of the protein content of the blood.
2. a plasma cell dyscrasia.

dys·pro·tein·e·mi·a

(dis-prō'tēn-ē'mē-ă),
An abnormality in plasma proteins, usually in immunoglobulins.

dysproteinemia

[disprō′tēnē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + protos, first, haima, blood
an abnormality of the protein content of the blood, usually involving the immunoglobulins.

dys·pro·tein·e·mi·a

(dis-prō'tēn-ē'mē-ă)
An abnormality in plasma proteins, usually in immunoglobulins.

dysproteinemia

disorder of the protein content of the blood. This may be associated with clotting defects due to concurrent thrombocytopenia or to coating of the platelet with the abnormal protein.
References in periodicals archive ?
2 g/dL) of known isotype (62 IgG, 36 IgA, and 77 IgM) were pulled from the Mayo Clinic Dysproteinemia Biobank (Cohort 2d).
California-based anatomic and clinical pathologist Gamble has produced a detailed guide based on 147 cases of renal involvement associated with dysproteinemia in university and community hospital settings over some 25 years.
All queries to the Laboratory Information System or Dysproteinemia database followed a protocol on the "Natural History of Monoclonal Gammopathies," approved by the Mayo Clinic Institutional Review Board.
The 4 categories include (1) crystalline nephropathies seen in the setting of dysproteinemia, (2) drug-induced crystalline nephropathies, (3) crystalline nephropathies related to calcium deposition, and (4) metabolic and genetic forms of crystalline nephropathy.
Spurious hyperphosphatemia in patients with dysproteinemia is well documented (6, 7).
A serum dysproteinemia consisting of a polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia is present in up to 80% of patients.
9) contains several important lessons that resonate with our own clinical laboratory experience, which involved a large dysproteinemia clinical practice, and our publications on diagnostic detection limit, which were from clinical trials and/or studies with well-defined patient groups.
She was also actively involved in the clinical immunology laboratory in the dysproteinemia area.
The list of 1020 patients was merged with data from the Dysproteinemia database, which contained each patient's diagnosis, date of diagnosis, and serum and urine IFE results.