dysproteinemia

dysproteinemia

 [dis-pro″tēn-e´me-ah]
1. disorder of the protein content of the blood.
2. a plasma cell dyscrasia.

dys·pro·tein·e·mi·a

(dis-prō'tēn-ē'mē-ă),
An abnormality in plasma proteins, usually in immunoglobulins.

dysproteinemia

[disprō′tēnē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + protos, first, haima, blood
an abnormality of the protein content of the blood, usually involving the immunoglobulins.

dys·pro·tein·e·mi·a

(dis-prō'tēn-ē'mē-ă)
An abnormality in plasma proteins, usually in immunoglobulins.

dysproteinemia

disorder of the protein content of the blood. This may be associated with clotting defects due to concurrent thrombocytopenia or to coating of the platelet with the abnormal protein.
References in periodicals archive ?
California-based anatomic and clinical pathologist Gamble has produced a detailed guide based on 147 cases of renal involvement associated with dysproteinemia in university and community hospital settings over some 25 years.
I would volunteer to see their patient in the dysproteinemia clinic and they would agree.
Spurious hyperphosphatemia in patients with dysproteinemia is well documented (6, 7).
The effects of rheumatoid factors, biotin, and dysproteinemia were checked in the laboratory of the manufacturer.
Diffuse pulmonary lymphoreticular infiltrations associated with dysproteinemia.
She was also actively involved in the clinical immunology laboratory in the dysproteinemia area.
The list of 1020 patients was merged with data from the Dysproteinemia database, which contained each patient's diagnosis, date of diagnosis, and serum and urine IFE results.
Crystal-storing histiocytosis is another rare condition associated with dysproteinemia, and it has significant overlap with LCFS.
9) contains several important lessons that resonate with our own clinical laboratory experience, which involved a large dysproteinemia clinical practice, and our publications on diagnostic detection limit, which were from clinical trials and/or studies with well-defined patient groups.
Of the latter, 12 patients were diagnosed with PTCL-NOS, six with Angioimmunoblastic Lymphadenopathy with Dysproteinemia (AILD), one with enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma, one with NK-cell lymphoma, and one with T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL).
Defects Responsible for Hypercoagulability Inherited Activated protein C resistance (factor V Leiden) Protein S deficiency Protein C deficiency Antithrombin deficiency Hyperhomocysteinemia Prothrombin 20210A allele Dysplasminogenemia High plasminogen activator inhibitor Dysfibrinogenemia Elevated factor VIII Acquired Antiphospholipid syndrome Hyperhomocysteinemia Miscellaneous Thrombocythemia Dysproteinemia Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia Estrogens Birth control pills Hormone replacement therapy Noncoagulant factors Malignancy Pregnancy Bed rest Surgery Trauma Miscellaneous TABLE 2 Frequency of Inherited Defects and Hypercoagulability (*) Gene Cause of Disorder Frequency Hypercoagulability APC resistance 3.