dysphonia


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dysphonia

 [dis-fo´ne-ah]
any voice impairment; difficulty in speaking. adj., adj dysphon´ic.
dysphonia clerico´rum clergyman's sore throat.

dys·pho·ni·a

(dis-fō'nē-ă),
Altered voice production.
[dys- + G. phōnē, voice]

dysphonia

/dys·pho·nia/ (-fo´ne-ah) a voice impairment or speech disorder.dysphon´ic

dysphonia

(dĭs-fō′nē-ə)
n.
Difficulty in speaking, usually evidenced by hoarseness.

dys·phon′ic (-fŏn′ĭk) adj.

dysphonia

[disfō′nē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + phone, voice
any abnormality in the speaking voice, such as hoarseness. Dysphonia puberum refers to the voice changes that occur in adolescent boys.

dysphonia

Neurology Speech impairment or difficulty, often due to vocal cord dysfunction. See Spasmodic dysphonia.

dys·pho·ni·a

(dis-fō'nē-ă)
Any disorder of phonation affecting voice quality or ability to produce voice.
See: aphonia
[dys- + G. phōnē, voice]

dysphonia

Impairment of normal voice production, from any cause, such as LARYNGITIS, singer's nodes, ‘CLERGYMAN'S THROAT’, paralysis of one of the nerves to the larynx (recurrent laryngeal nerve).
References in periodicals archive ?
In abductor spasmodic dysphonia, sudden involuntary muscle movements or spasms cause the vocal folds to open.
Even though these features may appear to overlap, for example, dysphonia may be part of a dysarthria, each offers unique information and is important in the clinical evaluation of swallowing.
Presenting symptoms include hoarseness, hemoptysis, dysphagia, dysphonia, dyspnea, and odynophagia.
The most frequently observed adverse drug reactions ([greater than or equal to]30%) in STIVARGA-treated patients vs placebo-treated patients in mCRC, respectively, were: asthenia/fatigue (64% vs 46%), decreased appetite and food intake (47% vs 28%), HFSR/PPE (45% vs 7%), diarrhea (43% vs 17%), mucositis (33% vs 5%), weight loss (32% vs 10%), infection (31% vs 17%), hypertension (30% vs 8%), and dysphonia (30% vs 6%).
Patients can present with a variety of vocal complaints that range from dysphonia to aphonia; vocal fatigue, soft voice, and short phrase length are common.
This whispering dysphonia may continue throughout life as an isolated feature, but more commonly is the initial presentation of a more pervasive disease with extremely varied expression.
This fibrosis can lead to strictures, stenosis, trismus, ulcerations, and scarring, which can present as dysphagia and dysphonia.
More than half of the 37 singers who were screened discovered they had vocal problems resulting from nodules and polyps on their vocal folds, atrophy, muscle tension dysphonia, allergy or acid reflux.
and others with vocal overuse syndromes, recurrent laryngitis, spasmodic dysphonia, vocal cord paralysis, the aging voice, cancer of the vocal cord, scarred vocal cords, and benign vocal cord growths, such as nodules, polyps, cysts, granulomas, and papillomas.
Strobovideolaryngoscopy revealed bilateral vocal fold atrophy, glottic insufficiency, right vocal fold paresis, and muscle tension dysphonia (MTD) (figure).
The most common adverse reactions observed in greater than or equal to 30% of LENVIMA-treated patients, in order of decreasing frequency, were: hypertension, fatigue, diarrhea, arthralgia/myalgia, decreased appetite, weight decreased, nausea, stomatitis, headache, vomiting, proteinuria, palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE) syndrome, abdominal pain, and dysphonia.
Dysphonia makeshistory Apieceofbloodstockhistorywascreated in the feature 7f conditions race when Dysphonia became the first progeny of multiple Australian Group 1 winner Lonhro to win in Britain, giving Godolphinand FrankieDettoriadouble intheprocess.