dysphagia


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dysphagia

 [dis-fa´jah]
difficulty in swallowing; see also aphagia. There are numerous underlying causes, including stroke and other neurologic conditions, local trauma and muscle damage, and a tumor or swelling that partially obstructs the passage of food. The condition can range from mild discomfort, such as a feeling that there is a lump in the throat, to a severe inability to control the muscles needed for chewing and swallowing.

Dysphagia can seriously compromise the nutritional status of a patient. Temporary measures such as tube feeding and parenteral nutrition can remedy the immediate problem, but long-term goals for rehabilitation must focus on helping the patient recover the ability to swallow sufficient amounts of food and drink to assure adequate nutrition.

Measures intended to accomplish the goal of oral feeding are implemented only after determining the particular techniques that are most helpful for the individual patient. In general, placing the patient in an upright position, providing a pleasant and calm environment, being sure the lips are closed as the patient begins to swallow, and preparing and serving foods of the proper consistency are all helpful techniques. Stroke victims who have difficulty swallowing should be turned, or should turn their heads, to the unaffected side to facilitate swallowing. If dry mouth is a problem, there are artificial salivas available to moisten and lubricate the mouth. When drinking fluids, dysphagic patients should sip the liquid in small amounts.
esophageal dysphagia dysphagia caused by an abnormality in the esophagus, such as a smooth muscle disorder that interferes with peristalsis or an obstruction from external compression or a stricture.
oropharyngeal dysphagia dysphagia caused by difficulty in initiating the swallowing process, so that solids and liquids cannot move out of the mouth properly.

dys·pha·gi·a

, dysphagy (dis-fā'jē-ă, dis'fă-jē),
Difficulty in swallowing.
See also: aglutition.
[dys- + G. phagō, to eat]

dysphagia

/dys·pha·gia/ (-fa´jah) difficulty in swallowing.

dysphagia

(dĭs-fā′jə, -jē-ə)
n.
Difficulty in swallowing.

dys·phag′ic (-făj′ĭk) adj.

dysphagia

[disfā′jē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + phagein, to swallow
difficulty in swallowing, commonly associated with obstructive or motor disorders of the oropharynx, hypopharynx, or esophagus. Patients with obstructive disorders, such as esophageal tumor or lower esophageal ring, are unable to swallow solids but can tolerate liquids. Persons with motor disorders, such as achalasia, are unable to swallow solids or liquids. Diagnosis of the underlying condition is made through barium studies, the observed clinical signs, and evaluation of the patient's symptoms. See also achalasia, aphagia, corkscrew esophagus.

dysphagia

Internal medicine Difficulty or inability to swallow, a finding that may indicate a brainstem tumor. See Malignant dysphagia. Cf Deglutition.

dys·pha·gi·a

, dysphagy (dis-fā'jē-ă, dis'fă-jē)
Difficulty in swallowing.
Synonym(s): aglutition.
[dys- + G. phagō, to eat]

dysphagia

Difficulty in swallowing. See also PHARYNGEAL POUCH, ACHALASIA and GLOBUS HYSTERICUS.

Dysphagia

Medical term for any difficulty, discomfort or pain when swallowing

dysphagia (dis·fāˑ·jē·),

n inability to swallow. May be caused by physical obstruction or disease or psychological illness.

dys·pha·gi·a

, dysphagy (dis-fā'jē-ă, dis'fă-jē)
Difficulty in swallowing.
Synonym(s): aglutition.
[dys- + G. phagō, to eat]

dysphagia (disfā´jēə),

n difficulty in swallowing. It may be caused by lesions in the oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx; neuromuscular disturbances; or mechanical obstruction of the esophagus (e.g., dysphagia of Plummer-Vinson syndrome [sideropenic dysphagia], peritonsillar abscess, Ludwig's angina, and carcinoma of the tongue, pharynx, larynx).

dysphagia

difficulty in swallowing.

cricopharyngeal dysphagia
see cricopharyngeal achalasia.
esophageal dysphagia
difficulty in swallowing due to esophageal malfunction.
gastroesophageal dysphagia
impaired passage of the bolus through the caudal esophageal sphincter.
neuropathic dysphagia
may be caused by lesions of the glossopharyngeal or vagus nerves or associated nuclei of the caudal medulla oblongata.
oropharyngeal dysphagia
abnormalities in mastication and pharyngeal contraction may be caused by hypoglossal nerve dysfunction, polyneuropathy, polymyositis, meningitis, brainstem lesions and generalized neuromuscular disease.

Patient discussion about dysphagia

Q. mouth ulcer and difficulty to swallow, below right side of inner tongue guggle salt water and vinigar dose'nt help

A. how big is it? mouth ulcers has a reason why they happen. sometimes a broken tooth, biting a sharp metal, a prosthetic that doesn't sit well..that sort of things. but sometimes it is caused by other stuff. any way, oral hygiene may relieve some of the symptoms. Topical (rubbed on) antihistamines, antacids, corticosteroids, or other soothing preparations may be recommended for applying on top of the ulcer. Avoid hot or spicy foods.

More discussions about dysphagia
References in periodicals archive ?
Dysphagia is frequently under recognised and under appreciated.
Observation of signs of oral and pharyngeal dysphagia Swallow screening evaluation is used to determine the need
Although the symptoms of DISH depend on its localization, the most common manifestations are back and neck pain, stiffness, restriction of mobility of the spine, and dysphagia due to esophageal compression (2).
Nearly half of all HCPs surveyed had not been trained on dysphagia in over 2 years , and 10% have not received any training whatsoever.
Complete resolution of dysphagia, defined as a dysphagia score of 0, occurred in 23% of the dilation group and 57% of the no-dilation controls, not a statistically significant difference.
Because many patients are required to take medications orally and consume a meal when admitted to the hospital, many of them may be put at risk for complications associated with dysphagia such as pulmonary problems; dehydration; malnutrition; aspiration and, subsequently, aspiration pneumonia; and even mortality (Martino et al.
Many of these patients cannot swallow a pill and those with more severe dysphagia may require the use of a feeding tube.
As the population ages, increasing patient discomfort, and the resultant increases in hospital and medical costs as a result of recurrent pneumonia caused by dysphagia, leads to a very compelling market opportunity for Swallow Solutions," said Terry Kelly, President of Venture Management, LLC, which has made more than 25 technology company investments in Wisconsin since the 1980s.
Thickened liquids are a frequent short-term intervention poststroke, keeping patients safe from respiratory infection and other dysphagia sequelae while additional interventions are initiated during recovery.
Dysphagia has been found to occur in approximately 40% to 50% of all patients in nursing homes and approximately 33% of the patients in rehabilitation centers.
This article provides a simple overview of the swallowing process and common clinical problems and a review of some of the current evaluations, treatments and rehabilitation options available to patients with dysphagia.
Background: Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and dysphagia.