dysmorphology


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dys·mor·phol·o·gy

(dis'mōr-fol'ŏ-jē),
General term for the study of, or the subject of, abnormal development of tissue form. A branch of clinical genetics.
[dys- + G. morphē, form, + logos, study]

dysmorphology

Neonatology The systemic study of structural defects of prenatal onset, a complex field in which single or multiple primary malformations are idiopathic or related to chromosome defects–recurrence rate of 2-5%, drugs, chemicals, toxins or radiation. See Deformation, Disruption, Malformation, Multiple malformation syndrome, Sequence.

dys·mor·phol·o·gy

(dis'mōr-fol'ŏ-jē)
The study of developmental structural defects. A branch of clinical genetics.
[dys- + G. morphē, form, + logos, study]

dys·mor·phol·o·gy

(dis'mōr-fol'ŏ-jē)
The study of developmental structural defects; a branch of clinical genetics.
[dys- + G. morphē, form, + logos, study]
References in periodicals archive ?
Face2Gene is a genetic search and reference solution powered by FDNA (Facial Dysmorphology Novel Analysis) technology.
The deleterious effect of ethanol on fetal development also is well-documented; major effects include intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, facial dysmorphology, cardiac and renal abnormalities, mental retardation, and neonatal withdrawal syndrome (Baker & Shephard, 1994).
FDNA, the pioneer in computer-aided dysmorphology analysis, has released today version 4 of Face2Gene, allowing geneticists around the globe to access Facial Dysmorphology Novel Analysis from computers, as well as mobile devices.
Although some part of the differential vulnerability for the development of FASD likely is the result of genetic and epigenetic factors in the mother and/or fetus (Warren and Li 2005), evidence gathered to date suggests that the most substantial contributor to the variability in dysmorphology and other developmental deficits arises from differences in the extent of alcohol exposure, drinking pattern, and other maternal risk factors.
An objective, quantitative approach to identifying the facial dysmorphology associated with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) would assist screening and surveillance efforts.
Researchers in Europe and the US report on their work, with discussion of genome architecture, clinical evaluation, database aids, 3D shape and molecular analyses of facial dysmorphology, monogenic causes, and the microdeletion/duplication syndromes, among other topics.
We don't know of any environmental exposures where a hundred percent of kids are affected," says Tina Chambers, a perinatal epidemiologist in the Division of Dysmorphology and Teratology at the University of California, San Diego.
The investigators also failed to identify an association between thimerosal-containing Rh immunoglobulin and various autism characteristics, including clinical diagnosis, IQ, gender, dysmorphology status, head size, and regressive versus early-onset autism spectrum disorder.
The drug, available in Canada but not in the United States at this time, has proved safe in terms of fetal dysmorphology, but its effects on the developing central nervous system have been unclear, the investigators reported in a poster presentation at the meeting.
Most counselors are familiar with a wide range of related subjects, including teratology dysmorphology, toxicology, pharmacology epidemiology, clinical genetics, and infectious diseases, as well as maternal-fetal medicine, radiation biology, and occupational health.
Without the obvious physical manifestation of the facial dysmorphology or confirmation from the birth mother of prenatal alcohol consumption it is difficult to diagnose FAS.
Notably, in the London Dysmorphology Database[7] (a computerized catalog of dysmorphic-neurogenetic disorders), 65 different syndromes (including HI) are listed under the same entry "patchy depigmentation of skin.