dysmetria


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dysmetria

 [dis-me´tre-ah]
inability to properly direct or limit motions.

dys·met·ri·a

(dis-mē'trē-ă, -met'rē-ă),
An aspect of ataxia, in which the ability to control the distance, power, and speed of an act is impaired. Usually used to describe abnormalities of movement caused by cerebellar disorders.
See also: hypermetria, hypometria.
[dys- + G. metron, measure]

dysmetria

/dys·me·tria/ (dis-me´tre-ah) disturbance of the power to control the range of movement in muscular action.

dysmetria

[dismē′trē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + metron, measure
an abnormal condition that prevents the affected individual from properly measuring distances associated with muscular acts and from controlling muscular action. It is associated with cerebellar lesions and typically characterized by overestimating or underestimating the range of motion needed to place the limbs correctly during voluntary movement. A normal person with eyes closed can move the arms from a position of 90 degrees of flexion to a position over the head and then return them to the 90-degree position; a person with dysmetria is unable to perform this test accurately. See also hypermetria, hypometria.

dys·met·ri·a

(dis-mē'trē-ă)
An aspect of ataxia, in which the ability to control the distance, power, and speed of an act is impaired; used to describe abnormalities of movement caused by cerebellar disorders.
See also: hypermetria, hypometria

dysmetria

An inability to adjust movements accurately, without visual assistance, so as to achieve their object. Dysmetria is a sign of malfunction of the CEREBELLUM.

dysmetria

inability to gauge distance and speed during gait, and/or strength and velocity of voluntary movement; associated with cerebellar dysfunction (see Table 1)
Table 1: Characteristic limb effects of cerebellar lesions
CharacteristicMuscular effects
DyssynergyMuscular decomposition
Accessory muscles used to achieve voluntary movements
Wide arc movements and past pointing
Aesthenia
Hyporeflexia
DysrhythmiaAbnormal timing and coupling of voluntary movements
Abnormal timing and coupling of voluntary movements during gait
DysmetriaThe loss of ability to gauge distance and speed, and strength and velocity of voluntary movement
The loss of ability to gauge distance and speed, and strength and velocity of voluntary movement during gait
Abnormal gaitUncoordinated ataxic gait
Wide-based gait
Slow, jerky, irregular cadence
Variation of stride length and foot placement from step to step, often with loss of balance
'Double tap' foot sounds, where foot contact occurs audibly in two phases: heel strike and toe contact
Constant postural adjustment

dys·met·ri·a

(dis-mē'trē-ă)
An aspect of ataxia, in which the ability to control the distance, power, and speed of an act is impaired.
[dys- + G. metron, measure]

dysmetria (dismē´trēə),

n the loss of ability to gauge distance, speed, or power of movement associated with muscle function; e.g., the patient is unable to control the force of closure and strikes the opposite occluding teeth with greater vigor than necessary.

dysmetria

inability to properly direct or limit motions. A characteristic of cerebellar lesions.
References in periodicals archive ?
A repeat EFV level done 7 days after stopping the drug showed persistently high levels (49 000 ng/mL), but the patient was able to walk unsupported and the dysmetria and dysdidadokinesia had improved.
Her headache resolved, and her diplopia and dysmetria were slightly improved.
Thus cerebellar dominance leads to dysmetria of motion and dysmetria of thought leading to dominant quantal perceptive mode.
On examination she was markedly ataxic, unable to walk or sit unsupported, and was noted to have titubation, dysmetria and dysdiadochokinesia.
Neurological examination revealed subtle left face and arm weakness, slight left pronator drift, right-sided tremor, and left-sided dysmetria.
Cerebellar damage can present with ataxia, dysmetria, dysdiadochokinesia, vertigo, hypotonia, nausea, and vomiting to varying degrees.
Following transfer to West Virginia University, the patient's neurologic exam revealed gait abnormalities, finger to nose dysmetria, horizontal nystagmus, vertigo, tinnitus, positive Weber and Rinne test, and severe headache and earache.
The only other significant finding was a bilateral dysmetria evidenced by grossly overshooting on the finger-to-finger test, more prominent on the right than left.
He had a severe cerebellar dysarthria, impaired rapid alternating movements and severe bilateral dysmetria of upper and lower extremities.
Upon discharge (day 16), the patient's only abnormal finding was mild dysmetria of the right hand.
Dysmetria, nystagmus, and dysdiadokinesia were each reported in three cases (10%), although all of these findings may not have been searched for or reported in all cases.