dyskinesia

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dyskinesia

 [dis-ki-ne´zhah]
impairment of the power of voluntary movement.
primary ciliary dyskinesia any of a group of hereditary syndromes characterized by delayed or absent mucociliary clearance from the airways; often there is also lack of motion of sperm. One variety is Kartagener's syndrome.
tardive dyskinesia an iatrogenic disorder produced by long-term administration of antipsychotic agents; it is characterized by oral-lingual-buccal dyskinesias that usually resemble continual chewing motions with intermittent darting movements of the tongue; there may also be choreoathetoid movements of the extremities. The disorder is more common in women than in men and in the elderly than in the young, and incidence is related to drug dosage and duration of treatment. In some patients symptoms disappear within several months after antipsychotic drugs are withdrawn; in others symptoms may persist indefinitely.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(dis'ki-nē'zē-ă), [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
Synonym(s): dyscinesia, dyskinesis
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]

dyskinesia

/dys·ki·ne·sia/ (-kĭ-ne´zhah) distortion or impairment of voluntary movement, as in tic or spasm.dyskinet´ic
biliary dyskinesia  derangement of the filling and emptying mechanism of the gallbladder.
dyskinesia intermit´tens  intermittent disability of the limbs due to impaired circulation.
orofacial dyskinesia  facial movements resembling those of tardive dyskinesia, seen in elderly, edentulous, demented patients.
primary ciliary dyskinesia  any of a group of hereditary syndromes characterized by delayed or absent mucociliary clearance from the airways, often accompanied by lack of motion of sperm.
tardive dyskinesia  an iatrogenic disorder of involuntary repetitive movements of facial, buccal, oral, and cervical muscles, induced by long-term use of antipsychotic agents, sometimes persisting after withdrawal of the agent.

dyskinesia

(dĭs′kə-nē′zhə, -kī-)
n.
An impairment in the ability to control movements, characterized by spasmodic or repetitive motions or lack of coordination.

dyskinesia

[dis′kinē′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + kinesis, movement
an impairment of the ability to execute voluntary movements. Tardive dyskinesia is caused by an adverse effect of prolonged use of phenothiazine medications in elderly patients or persons with brain injuries. See also tardive dyskinesia. dyskinetic [-et′ik] , adj.

dyskinesia

Neurology An alteration in muscle movement. See Biliary dyskinesia, Tardive dyskinesia.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă)
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements. Term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]

dyskinesia

Involuntary jerky or slow writhing movements, often of a fixed pattern. The dyskinesias include the TICS, MYOCLONUS, CHOREA and ATHETOSIS.

Dyskinesia

Impaired ability to make voluntary movements.

dyskinesia

difficulty in performing voluntary movements

dyskinesia (dis·ki·nēˑ·zhē·),

n difficulty of movement due to vertebral subluxation; one of the diagnostic components of the three-dimensional chiropractic assessment model. See also subluxation, vertebral.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă) [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; usually in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]

dyskinesia

impairment of the power of voluntary movement.

ciliary dyskinesia
see primary ciliary dyskinesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
A multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the association between scapular dyskinesis and assessment findings.
In recent literature, SIS has been described as a group of symptoms rather than a specific diagnosis5 and the causative factors are identified as trauma, daily wear and tear, repetitive use, age-related degeneration, RC dysfunction, scapular muscle weakness and dysfunction, imbalance between the concentrically activated agonist and eccentrically activated antagonist, posterior capsular tightness (PCT ),6,7 glenohumeral instability, postural abnormalities and scapular dyskinesis.
Discussione: Dai dati emersi dunque lo SCAPULAR DYSKINESIS TEST (SDTs) non sembra avere una affidabilita interesaminatore soddisfacente per poter essere utilizzato come metodo di valutazione delle disfunzioni scapolari in ambito clinico.
The athletic trainer (AT) assessed for labral pathology, joint instability, shoulder dyskinesis, swelling and deformity, of which all findings were negative (Table 2).
Transient left ventricular apical dyskinesis accompanied by ischemic-like electrocardiographic abnormalities in the absence of obstructive epicardial coronary artery disease is characteristic of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) (1).
showed normal coronary arteries and a left ventriculogram demonstrated global hypokinesis with apical dyskinesis.
Kibler and colleagues (22) found that 60 out of 64 patients with type II SLAP lesions demonstrated scapular dyskinesis.
Anticoagulant therapy may be considered for patients with ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) and anterior apical akinesis or dyskinesis (Class IIb).
Cardiac resynchronization therapy improves cardiac hemodynamics in heart failure patients with one or more of the following actions (7); i) increased LV filling time, ii) decreased septal dyskinesis, increased LV dp/dt, iii) reduced mitral regurgitation.
5) Scapular dyskinesis has been linked to numerous injury patterns around the shoulder, including acromioclavicular joint pain, subacromial impingement syndrome, glenohumeral instability, and rotator cuff pathology.