dyskinesia


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dyskinesia

 [dis-ki-ne´zhah]
impairment of the power of voluntary movement.
primary ciliary dyskinesia any of a group of hereditary syndromes characterized by delayed or absent mucociliary clearance from the airways; often there is also lack of motion of sperm. One variety is Kartagener's syndrome.
tardive dyskinesia an iatrogenic disorder produced by long-term administration of antipsychotic agents; it is characterized by oral-lingual-buccal dyskinesias that usually resemble continual chewing motions with intermittent darting movements of the tongue; there may also be choreoathetoid movements of the extremities. The disorder is more common in women than in men and in the elderly than in the young, and incidence is related to drug dosage and duration of treatment. In some patients symptoms disappear within several months after antipsychotic drugs are withdrawn; in others symptoms may persist indefinitely.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(dis'ki-nē'zē-ă), [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
Synonym(s): dyscinesia, dyskinesis
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]

dyskinesia

/dys·ki·ne·sia/ (-kĭ-ne´zhah) distortion or impairment of voluntary movement, as in tic or spasm.dyskinet´ic
biliary dyskinesia  derangement of the filling and emptying mechanism of the gallbladder.
dyskinesia intermit´tens  intermittent disability of the limbs due to impaired circulation.
orofacial dyskinesia  facial movements resembling those of tardive dyskinesia, seen in elderly, edentulous, demented patients.
primary ciliary dyskinesia  any of a group of hereditary syndromes characterized by delayed or absent mucociliary clearance from the airways, often accompanied by lack of motion of sperm.
tardive dyskinesia  an iatrogenic disorder of involuntary repetitive movements of facial, buccal, oral, and cervical muscles, induced by long-term use of antipsychotic agents, sometimes persisting after withdrawal of the agent.

dyskinesia

(dĭs′kə-nē′zhə, -kī-)
n.
An impairment in the ability to control movements, characterized by spasmodic or repetitive motions or lack of coordination.

dyskinesia

[dis′kinē′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + kinesis, movement
an impairment of the ability to execute voluntary movements. Tardive dyskinesia is caused by an adverse effect of prolonged use of phenothiazine medications in elderly patients or persons with brain injuries. See also tardive dyskinesia. dyskinetic [-et′ik] , adj.

dyskinesia

Neurology An alteration in muscle movement. See Biliary dyskinesia, Tardive dyskinesia.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă)
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements. Term usually used in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]

dyskinesia

Involuntary jerky or slow writhing movements, often of a fixed pattern. The dyskinesias include the TICS, MYOCLONUS, CHOREA and ATHETOSIS.

Dyskinesia

Impaired ability to make voluntary movements.

dyskinesia

difficulty in performing voluntary movements

dyskinesia (dis·ki·nēˑ·zhē·),

n difficulty of movement due to vertebral subluxation; one of the diagnostic components of the three-dimensional chiropractic assessment model. See also subluxation, vertebral.

dys·ki·ne·si·a

(diski-nēzē-ă) [MIM*242650]
Difficulty in performing voluntary movements; usually in relation to various extrapyramidal disorders.
[dys- + G. kinēsis, movement]

dyskinesia

impairment of the power of voluntary movement.

ciliary dyskinesia
see primary ciliary dyskinesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Company has two distinct Investigational New Drug Applications related to NBI-98854, tardive dyskinesia and Tourette syndrome, open with the Division of Psychiatry Products at the FDA.
Incidence and persistence of tardive dyskinesia and extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenia.
Companies Involved in Dyskinesia Therapeutics Development and mentioned in this research include Adamas Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
SNC-102 has the potential to be the first FDA-approved drug for tardive dyskinesia, a debilitating and often irreversible movement disorder, said William Kerns, DVM, Chief Executive Officer of Synchroneuron Inc.
Post-DBS UPDRS assessment revealed significant functional improvement and mild to minimal dyskinesia.
Silencing or "turning down" this system could possibly halt dyskinesia or slow its action.
Dr Brambilla's team was able to stop dyskinesia in animal models by turningdownthe activity of two key parts of this overactive pathway.
Biovail will pay up to USD 35 million in potential development and regulatory milestones associated with the initiation of a Phase III study, regulatory submissions and approvals of JP-1730/fipamezole in Dyskinesia Parkinson's Disease.
These movements met the neurological description of dyskinesia.
The FDA's statement refers to an unspecified number of spontaneous reports of tardive dyskinesia in patients who took metoclopramide, the majority of whom took it for more than 3 months, Metoclopramide was approved in 1983 for treating symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux and for diabetic gastroparesis.
Antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia is a potentially irremediable and debilitating condition with the onset most commonly associated with the use of first-generation antipsychotics.