dyskeratosis


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dyskeratosis

 [dis″ker-ah-to´sis]
abnormal, premature, or imperfect development of the keratinocytes. adj., adj dyskeratot´ic.

dys·ker·a·to·sis

(dis'ker-ă-tō'sis),
1. Premature keratinization in individual epithelial cells that have not reached the keratinizing surface layer; dyskeratotic cells generally become rounded and they may break away from adjacent cells and fall off.
2. Epidermalization of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium.
3. A disorder of keratinization.
[dys- + G. keras, horn, + -osis, condition]

dyskeratosis

/dys·ker·a·to·sis/ (-ker-ah-to´sis) abnormal, premature, or imperfect keratinization of the keratinocytes.dyskeratot´ic

dyskeratosis

[dis′kerətō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, dys + keras, horn, osis, condition
an abnormal or premature keratinization of epithelial cells.

dys·ker·a·to·sis

(dis-ker'ă-tō'sis)
1. Premature keratinization in individual epithelial cells that have not reached the keratinizing surface layer; dyskeratotic cells generally become rounded, and they may break away from adjacent cells and fall off.
2. Epidermalization of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium.
3. A disorder of keratinization.
[dys- + G. keras, horn, + -osis, condition]

dyskeratosis

Abnormal, excessive or imperfect KERATINIZATION of cells of the EPIDERMIS. DYSPLASIA of a squamous epithelium.

dyskeratosis

abnormal keratinization characterized by incomplete conversion of skin cells to keratin, usually characterized by scaling and parakeratosis

dyskeratosis

Abnormal process which, in the eye, results in hornification of the epithelial layer of the conjunctiva or cornea. It may be hereditary or due to irritation (e.g. radiation) or to prolonged drug administration in the eye. It appears as a dry white plaque (called leucoplakia or leucokeratosis). It may be benign or malignant, in which case it must be surgically excised. See pterygium.

dys·ker·a·to·sis

(dis-ker'ă-tō'sis)
Premature keratinization in individual epithelial cells that have not reached the keratinizing surface layer.
[dys- + G. keras, horn, + -osis, condition]

dyskeratosis (dis´kerətō´sis),

n an irreversible alteration in the maturation of stratified squamous epithelium. Refers to an increase of abnormal mitosis, individual cell keratinization, epithelial pearls within the spinous layer, loss of polarity of the cells, hyperchromatism, nuclear atypia, and basilar hyperplasia.
Enlarge picture
Dyskeratosis.

dyskeratosis

abnormal, premature or imperfect keratinization of the keratinocytes as in primary seborrhea.
References in periodicals archive ?
A telomerase component is defective in the human disease dyskeratosis congenita.
Short telomeres in such patients are implicated in a variety of disorders including dyskeratosis congenita, aplastic anaemia, pulmonary fibrosis, and cancer.
Guinan, case related to missed diagnosis of dyskeratosis congenita.
Also, some physiologic squamous maturation is retained in the proliferating epithelium, without the individual or grouped cellular dyskeratosis seen in most carcinomas.
Stratum corneum thickness and the degree of epidermal dyskeratosis were evaluated by using a four-point scoring system: 0, none; 1, mild; 2, moderate; and 3, severely dyskeratotic or thickened stratum corneum.
Cutaneous dyskeratosis in free-ranging desert tortoises, Gopherus agassizii, in the Colorado Desert of southern California.
They have abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, but they rarely show keratin pearl formation or dyskeratosis.
Finally, human genetic disorders such as Dyskeratosis Congenita that cause decreased telomerase activity in all cells throughout life show shortened telomeres at birth and rapid progression to diseases in highly proliferative tissues such as bone marrow and skin.
He suffered from the rare bone marrow disorder dyskeratosis cognetia, which affects just one in a million children world-wide.
Telomere elongation in induced pluripotent stem cells from dyskeratosis congenital patients.
However, the affiliation appears not to be direct, because of the lack of evidence of direct dyskeratosis or occlusion of sweat ducts by the leukemic infiltrates.
Furthermore, a number of inherited conditions, for example Down syndrome, Fanconi anemia, Bloom syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, Werner syndrome, Shwachman syndrome, Blackfan-Diamond syndrome, and Klinefelter syndrome, carry an increased risk of AML [5,6].