dysgerminoma

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dysgerminoma

 [dis-jer″mĭ-no´mah]
a solid, often radiosensitive, malignant ovarian neoplasm derived from undifferentiated germinal cells; the counterpart of seminoma of the testis.

dys·ger·mi·no·ma

(dis'jĕr-mi-nō'mă),
A malignant neoplasm of the ovary (counterpart of seminoma of the testis), composed of undifferentiated gonadal germinal cells and occurring more frequently in patients younger than 20 years of age. The neoplasms are grayish yellow and firm, contain foci of necrosis and hemorrhage, and tend to be encapsulated; characteristically, they spread by way of lymphatic vessels, but widespread metastases also occur.
Synonym(s): disgerminoma
[dys- + L. germen, a bud or sprout, + G. -ōma, tumor]

dysgerminoma

/dys·ger·mi·no·ma/ (-jer″mĭ-no´mah) a malignant ovarian neoplasm, thought to be derived from primordial germ cells of the sexually undifferentiated embryonic gonad; it is the counterpart of the classical testicular seminoma.

dysgerminoma

[dis′jərminō′mə] pl. dysgerminomas, dysgerminomata
Etymology: Gk, dys + L, germen, germ; Gk, oma, tumor
a rare malignant tumor of the ovary that occurs in young women and is believed to arise from the undifferentiated germ cells of the embryonic gonad. The tumor is histologically identical to seminoma. Dysgerminomas are extremely sensitive to irradiation and chemotherapy, and most patients retain their fertility. Also called embryoma of the ovary, ovarian seminoma.

dys·ger·mi·no·ma

(dis'jĕr-mi-nō'mă)
A rare malignant neoplasm of the ovary composed of undifferentiated gonadal germinal cells and occurring more frequently in patients younger than 20 years of age. The neoplasms contain foci of necrosis and hemorrhage and tend to be encapsulated; characteristically, they spread by way of lymphatic vessels, but widespread metastases also occur.
[dys- + L. germen, a bud or sprout, + G. -ōma, tumor]

dysgerminoma

a solid, often radiosensitive, malignant ovarian neoplasm derived from undifferentiated germinal cells; the counterpart of seminoma of the testis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1: Morphological classification of ovarian neoplasms Sest Germ cell Sex cord stromal Metastatic Serous Teratoma: Granulosa cell Krukernberg/drop Mature/ immature Mucinous Dysgerminoma Fibrous tumor Loco-regional metastasis Endometrioid Endodermal sinus sclerosing stromal cell (yolk sac) cell Clear cell Choriocarcinoma sertoli-stromal cell (leydig) Brenner Embryonal cell Steroid cell Undifferentiated Struma ovarii
Pregnancies complicated by dysgerminoma and Krukenberg tumour had favourable foetal outcome.
After operation, chemotherapy is suggested for all MGCTs excluding Stage I dysgerminoma or Stage I Grade 1 immature teratoma.
Treatment for early-stage dysgerminoma is surgical; young women should have at least unilateral oophorectomy performed; if the contralateral ovary is spared there's a 10% risk for recurrence over the next 2 years.
01%) of which dysgerminoma was the commonest malignant subtype constituting 14 cases (6.
Ovarian dysgerminomas are characterized by frequent KIT mutations and abundant expression of pluripotency markers.
Several cases of pregnancies after treatment of dysgerminomas with various modalities including surgery and chemotherapy, have been reported previously.
This tumor was named a dysgerminoma, a term that more closely describes its mixed-sex nature (Fig.
A histopathological study of canine and feline ovarian dysgerminomas.
The most common germ cell tumors, found primarily in children and young women, are dysgerminoma, endodermal sinus tumor, embryonal carcinoma, malignant teratoma, and choriocarcinoma.
76% mature cystic teratomas (2 cases of struma ovarii, 1 strumal carcinoid and 1 squamous cell carcinoma arising in mature cystic teratoma reported), one case of immature teratoma with gliomatosis peritonei, 4 cases of malignant dysgerminoma and one malignant mixed germ cell tumour (dysgerminoma+yolk sac component).
LDH is elevated in women with ovarian dysgerminomas and is reliable in pregnancy outside of HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets).