dysgerminoma

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dysgerminoma

 [dis-jer″mĭ-no´mah]
a solid, often radiosensitive, malignant ovarian neoplasm derived from undifferentiated germinal cells; the counterpart of seminoma of the testis.

dys·ger·mi·no·ma

(dis'jĕr-mi-nō'mă),
A malignant neoplasm of the ovary (counterpart of seminoma of the testis), composed of undifferentiated gonadal germinal cells and occurring more frequently in patients younger than 20 years of age. The neoplasms are grayish yellow and firm, contain foci of necrosis and hemorrhage, and tend to be encapsulated; characteristically, they spread by way of lymphatic vessels, but widespread metastases also occur.
Synonym(s): disgerminoma
[dys- + L. germen, a bud or sprout, + G. -ōma, tumor]

dysgerminoma

/dys·ger·mi·no·ma/ (-jer″mĭ-no´mah) a malignant ovarian neoplasm, thought to be derived from primordial germ cells of the sexually undifferentiated embryonic gonad; it is the counterpart of the classical testicular seminoma.

dysgerminoma

[dis′jərminō′mə] pl. dysgerminomas, dysgerminomata
Etymology: Gk, dys + L, germen, germ; Gk, oma, tumor
a rare malignant tumor of the ovary that occurs in young women and is believed to arise from the undifferentiated germ cells of the embryonic gonad. The tumor is histologically identical to seminoma. Dysgerminomas are extremely sensitive to irradiation and chemotherapy, and most patients retain their fertility. Also called embryoma of the ovary, ovarian seminoma.

dys·ger·mi·no·ma

(dis'jĕr-mi-nō'mă)
A rare malignant neoplasm of the ovary composed of undifferentiated gonadal germinal cells and occurring more frequently in patients younger than 20 years of age. The neoplasms contain foci of necrosis and hemorrhage and tend to be encapsulated; characteristically, they spread by way of lymphatic vessels, but widespread metastases also occur.
[dys- + L. germen, a bud or sprout, + G. -ōma, tumor]

dysgerminoma

a solid, often radiosensitive, malignant ovarian neoplasm derived from undifferentiated germinal cells; the counterpart of seminoma of the testis.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is reactive in seminomas, dysgerminomas, and spermatocytic seminoma.
Microscopically, gonadoblastomas contain 2 main cell types: immature germ cells similar to those in dysgerminomas and seminomas, and sex cord-stromal cells, which resemble immature granulosa cells or Sertoli cells (Figure 5, A).
Selected immunohistochemical markers can also be helpful to distinguish the different germ cell-tumor elements: dysgerminomas reveal immunohistochemical expression of PLAP, OCT3/4 and c-kit; embryonal carcinomas show positivity for CD30, PLAP, a-fetoprotein, keratin, and human chorionic gonadotropin; yolk sac tumors are immunoreactive for a-fetoprotein, PLAP, alkaline phosphatase, and keratins; and choriocarcinomas show expression of human chorionic gonadotropin, cytokeratin, PLAP, and human placental lactogen.
Patients with gonadal dysgenesis, who have a Y chromosome on karyotypic analysis or have evidence of Y chromosome fragments by molecular analysis, have an increased risk for developing germ cell tumors, particularly dysgerminoma.
23,24) Cheng et al (25) reported that OCT4 was expressed in all 33 cases of ovarian dysgerminomas examined, including metastases, while no immunoreactivity was noted in all 111 cases of ovarian nondysgerminomatous tumors with the exception of 4 of 14 clear cell carcinomas of ovary that showed focal (<10%) positivity.
Production of a monoclonal antibody specific for seminomas and dysgerminomas.