dysesthesia


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dysesthesia

 [dis″es-the´zhah]
1. impairment of any sense, especially of the sense of touch.
2. a painful, persistent sensation induced by a gentle touch of the skin.

dys·es·the·si·a

(dis'es-thē'zē-ă),
1. Impairment of sensation short of anesthesia.
2. A condition in which a disagreeable sensation is produced by ordinary stimuli; caused by lesions of the sensory pathways, peripheral or central.
3. Abnormal sensations experienced in the absence of stimulation.
[G. dysaisthēsia, fr. dys-, hard, difficult, + aisthēsis, sensation]

dysesthesia

/dys·es·the·sia/ (dis″es-the´zhah)
1. distortion of any sense, especially of the sense of touch.
2. an unpleasant abnormal sensation produced by normal stimuli.dysesthet´ic

auditory dysesthesia  dysacusis (2).

dysesthesia

[dis′esthē′zhə]
a common effect of spinal cord injury characterized by sensations of numbness, tingling, burning, or pain felt below the level of the lesion. It may also follow a dermatome distribution of a spinal nerve, as in the pain of shingles. Also spelled dysaesthesia.

dys·es·the·si·a

(dis'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. Impairment of sensation short of anesthesia.
2. A condition in which a disagreeable sensation is produced by ordinary stimuli; caused by lesions of the sensory pathways, peripheral or central.
3. Abnormal sensations experienced in the absence of stimulation.
Synonym(s): dysaesthesia.

dysesthesia (disˈ·es·theˑ·zhē·),

n symptom of a neurologic disorder in which the patient experiences unusual sensations without any stimulation.

dys·es·the·si·a

(dis'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. Impairment of sensation short of anesthesia.
2. A condition in which a disagreeable sensation is produced by ordinary stimuli; caused by lesions of the sensory pathways, peripheral or central.
Synonym(s): dysaesthesia

dysesthesia (dis´esthē´zhə, -zēə),

n an impairment of the senses, especially the sense of touch. No sensation is painful with dysesthesia.

dysesthesia

1. impairment of any sense.
2. abnormal perception of a sensory stimulus. Assumed to occur in animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, during the 6-month period, four overflow accidents occurred, each reportedly followed by several hours of intensified dizziness and nausea, asthenia, tingling of the upper and lower limbs, and dysesthesia of the hands (the same set of symptoms the patient recalled experiencing after using solvents for cleaning tasks in the hot-melt department).
EG Stewart, "Vulvodynia: diagnosing and managing generalized dysesthesia," OBG Management 13 (2001):48-57.
The guideline uses terminology that the International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Disease (ISSVD) recently adopted for vulvodynia, which has had multiple names, including vulvar vestibulitis syndrome and vulvar dysesthesia.
The guideline uses terminology the International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Disease (ISSVD) recently adopted for vulvodynia, which has had multiple names, including vulvar vestibulitis syndrome and vulvar dysesthesia.
The primary indications for nerve repair or grafting are 1) an injury or continuity defect in a nerve, as a result of trauma, pathology, surgery, or disease, that cannot regain normal function without surgical intervention and 2) loss of normal neurologic function, resulting in anesthesia, paresthesia, dysesthesia, or paralysis, that cannot be corrected by nonsurgical treatment.
Some patients with hairy leukoplakia do experience symptoms including mild pain, dysesthesia, alteration of taste, and the psychological impact of its unsightly cosmetic appearance.
The feeling of a tight band or girdle, typically constricting the upper chest, is a common MS-related dysesthesia.
Adverse effects shown in tanezumab trials indicate peripheral neuropathy, dysesthesia and paresthesia were the most frequent, however, no patient has taken tanezumab for longer than 6 months.
In this randomized controlled 3-month follow-up study, 52 patients suffering from numbness, parestesia, and dysesthesia in the innervation area of the median nerve were assessed; 40 patients were electrodiagnosed to be concordant with the inclusion criteria, and they were randomly assigned into two groups.
Schwannomas can cause symptoms of dysesthesia, sensory loss, weakness or radicular-type pain, but most patients will remain asymptomatic.
Paresthesia (pins and needles), dysesthesia (burning sensation), or anesthesia (numbness) can present clinically.