dyscrasia

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dyscrasia

 [dis-kra´zhah]
a condition related to a disease or pathologic state, usually referring to an imbalance of component elements. adj., adj dyscrat´ic.
blood dyscrasia a pathologic condition of the blood, usually referring to a disorder of the cellular elements of the blood.
plasma cell d's a diverse group of neoplastic diseases involving proliferation of a single clone of cells producing a serum M component (a monoclonal immunoglobulin or immunoglobulin fragment); the cells usually have plasma cell morphology, but may have lymphocytic or lymphoplasmacytic morphology. The group includes multiple myeloma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, the heavy chain diseases, benign monoclonal gammopathy, and immunocytic amyloidosis. Called also paraproteinemias and monoclonal gammopathies.

dys·cra·si·a

(dis-krā'zē-ă),
1. A morbid general state resulting from the presence of abnormal material in the blood, usually applied to diseases affecting blood cells or platelets.
2. Old term indicating disease.
[G. bad temperament, fr. dys- + krasis, a mixing]

dyscrasia

/dys·cra·sia/ (-kra´zhah) [Gr.] a term formerly used to indicate an abnormal mixture of the four humors; in surviving usages it is now roughly synonymous with disease or pathologic condition.
plasma cell dyscrasias  a diverse group of neoplastic diseases involving proliferation of a single clone of cells producing a serum M component (a monoclonal immunoglobulin or immunoglobulin fragment) and usually having a plasma cell morphology; it includes multiple myeloma and heavy chain diseases.

dyscrasia

(dĭs-krā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
An abnormal bodily condition, especially of the blood.

dyscrasia

[diskrā′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + krasis, mingling
pertaining to an abnormal condition of the blood or bone marrow, such as leukemia, aplastic anemia, or prenatal Rh incompatibility.

dyscrasia

See Blood dyscrasia, Plasma cell dyscrasia, Plasma cell dyscrasia with polyneuropathy.

dys·cra·si·a

(dis-krā'zē-ă)
Any morbid general state resulting from the presence of abnormal material in the blood, usually applied to diseases affecting blood cells or platelets.
[G. bad temperament, fr. dys- + krasis, a mixing]

dyscrasia

A vague term meaning any abnormal condition of the body.

dys·cra·si·a

(dis-krā'zē-ă)
Morbid general state resulting from presence of abnormal material in blood.
[G. bad temperament, fr. dys- + krasis, a mixing]

dyscrasia (diskrā´zhə, -zēə),

n 1. a morbid condition, especially one that involves an imbalance of component elements.
n 2. an abnormal composition of the blood, such as that found in leukemia and anemia.

dyscrasia

a morbid condition, usually referring to an imbalance of component elements.

blood dyscrasia
any abnormal or pathological condition of the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
1) As such, a detailed history of prescription and nonprescription medication use must be obtained--particularly in the setting of blood dyscrasias.
No cases of relapse or secondary blood dyscrasias were noted in the allogeneic BMT group at 3 years posttransplant.
The drugs in this class have serious adverse effects including blood dyscrasias and hepatic impairment and are typically used as second-line, or even third-line, agents.
FATALITIES HAVE OCCURRED, ALTHOUGH RARELY, DUE TO SEVERE REACTIONS TO SULFONAMIDES INCLUDING STEVENS-JOHNSON SYNDROME, TOXIC EPIDERMAL NECROLYSIS, FULMINANT HEPATIC NECROSIS, AGRANULOCYTOSIS, APLASTIC ANEMIA AND OTHER BLOOD DYSCRASIAS.
It is essential for otolaryngologists and head and neck surgeons to be familiar with this entity because total excision and radiation therapy for plasmacytomas can be curative in patients who have no underlying overt plasma cell dyscrasias.
A few patients have some form of plasma cell dyscrasias or other form of lymphoproliferative disorders, but most do not.
It covers anemias, bone marrow failure syndromes, hemolytic anemias, disorders of platelets, acute and chronic leukemia, myelofibrosis, plasma cell dyscrasias, infections, and stem cell transplant.
Side effects: Hypersensitivity and allergic reactions including anaphylaxis, skin rash, angioedema, Stevens Johnson syndrome and blood dyscrasias.
To date, work has focused almost entirely on the role of FLCs for the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with plasma cell dyscrasias (7), and these assays have been incorporated into a number of international clinical guidelines (8).
Common AR conditions such as the aforementioned genetic blood dyscrasias and rare AR disorders such as undifferentiated congenital deafness, osteogenesis imperfecta type III and spinal muscular atrophy, exemplify this situation.
Dr Picken has also coauthored a chapter on plasma cell dyscrasias and amyloidosis in the 6th edition of Heptinstall's Pathology of the Kidney.
We foresee the use of sFLC and Hevylite tests to be important and critical diagnostic tools to clinicians in assessing multiple myeloma and AL amyloidosis and managing patients with B cell dyscrasias.