dyscrasia


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dyscrasia

 [dis-kra´zhah]
a condition related to a disease or pathologic state, usually referring to an imbalance of component elements. adj., adj dyscrat´ic.
blood dyscrasia a pathologic condition of the blood, usually referring to a disorder of the cellular elements of the blood.
plasma cell d's a diverse group of neoplastic diseases involving proliferation of a single clone of cells producing a serum M component (a monoclonal immunoglobulin or immunoglobulin fragment); the cells usually have plasma cell morphology, but may have lymphocytic or lymphoplasmacytic morphology. The group includes multiple myeloma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, the heavy chain diseases, benign monoclonal gammopathy, and immunocytic amyloidosis. Called also paraproteinemias and monoclonal gammopathies.

dys·cra·si·a

(dis-krā'zē-ă),
1. A morbid general state resulting from the presence of abnormal material in the blood, usually applied to diseases affecting blood cells or platelets.
2. Old term indicating disease.
[G. bad temperament, fr. dys- + krasis, a mixing]

dyscrasia

/dys·cra·sia/ (-kra´zhah) [Gr.] a term formerly used to indicate an abnormal mixture of the four humors; in surviving usages it is now roughly synonymous with disease or pathologic condition.
plasma cell dyscrasias  a diverse group of neoplastic diseases involving proliferation of a single clone of cells producing a serum M component (a monoclonal immunoglobulin or immunoglobulin fragment) and usually having a plasma cell morphology; it includes multiple myeloma and heavy chain diseases.

dyscrasia

(dĭs-krā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
An abnormal bodily condition, especially of the blood.

dyscrasia

[diskrā′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + krasis, mingling
pertaining to an abnormal condition of the blood or bone marrow, such as leukemia, aplastic anemia, or prenatal Rh incompatibility.

dyscrasia

See Blood dyscrasia, Plasma cell dyscrasia, Plasma cell dyscrasia with polyneuropathy.

dys·cra·si·a

(dis-krā'zē-ă)
Any morbid general state resulting from the presence of abnormal material in the blood, usually applied to diseases affecting blood cells or platelets.
[G. bad temperament, fr. dys- + krasis, a mixing]

dyscrasia

A vague term meaning any abnormal condition of the body.

dys·cra·si·a

(dis-krā'zē-ă)
Morbid general state resulting from presence of abnormal material in blood.
[G. bad temperament, fr. dys- + krasis, a mixing]

dyscrasia (diskrā´zhə, -zēə),

n 1. a morbid condition, especially one that involves an imbalance of component elements.
n 2. an abnormal composition of the blood, such as that found in leukemia and anemia.

dyscrasia

a morbid condition, usually referring to an imbalance of component elements.

blood dyscrasia
any abnormal or pathological condition of the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lupus profundus, indeterminate lymphocytic lobular panniculitis and subcutaneous T-cell lymphoma: a spectrum of subcuticular T-cell lymphoid dyscrasia.
The diagnosis of AL amyloidosis requires 1) demonstration of amyloid in tissue and 2) demonstration of a plasma cell dyscrasia.
A Swedish study looking at spontaneous reports of blood dyscrasias with dipyrone estimated the reported incidence of agranulocytosis to be approximately 1:1,400, considerably higher than previous studies.
Classification of systemic amyloidosis AL (light-chain immunoglobulin) Plasma-cell/immunocyte dyscrasia Multiple myeloma AA (serum protein A) Acute-phase protein produced in response to inflammation Rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, osteomyelitis, tuberculosis, familial Mediterranean fever Gastric carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, Hodgkin's disease A[beta]2M ([[beta].
A clinical scenario in which these findings would likely be relevant might be the determination of heterozygosity for Tay-Sachs disease for an individual who has a pathologic deviation of the normal leukocyte differential, perhaps as a result of a severe inflammatory condition or a hematopoietic cell dyscrasia.
The plasma cell dyscrasia was further characterized as symptomatic plasma cell myeloma (PCM) in 8 patients and as smoldering (asymptomatic) myeloma in 3 patients.
Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell dyscrasia that can have various clinical presentations.
In the presence of a plasma cell dyscrasia, such as MM, NSM, or AL amyloidosis, an increased serum concentration of the abnormal, monoclonal FLC is expected (1-4).
Systemic factors include a vascular disorder, a blood dyscrasia, a hematologic malignancy, allergy, malnutrition, alcohol use, hypertension, a drug reaction, and infection.
Flow cytometry revealed no evidence of plasma cell dyscrasia or B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder.
A monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is marked by the presence of monoclonal immuno-globulin without evidence of plasma cell dyscrasia (1-3).
If associated with a cellular infiltrate, plasmacytoma, plasma cell dyscrasia, and plasmacytoid, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma needs to be ruled out.