dysaesthesia


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dysaesthesia

dys·es·the·si·a

(dis'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. Impairment of sensation short of anesthesia.
2. A condition in which a disagreeable sensation is produced by ordinary stimuli; caused by lesions of the sensory pathways, peripheral or central.
3. Abnormal sensations experienced in the absence of stimulation.
Synonym(s): dysaesthesia.

dysaesthesia

abnormal sensation, e.g. innocuous stimulus perceived as unpleasant sensation

dysaesthesia (dīˈ·as·thēsˑ·ē·ā),

n a disagreeable, atypical sensation; maybe spontaneous or induced.

dys·es·the·si·a

(dis'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. Impairment of sensation short of anesthesia.
2. A condition in which a disagreeable sensation is produced by ordinary stimuli; caused by lesions of the sensory pathways, peripheral or central.
Synonym(s): dysaesthesia
References in periodicals archive ?
The occurrence of iatrogenic paraesthesia or dysaesthesia at the moment of dural puncture during performance of a 'needle through needle' CSE technique has been described more recently (4,5,19,20).
However, to reduce the incidence of paraesthesia and dysaesthesia accompanying their use, we now routinely inject lignocaine through the epidural needle prior to 'needle through needle' insertion of the needle.
Between 37% (4) and 81%5 of parturients experience paraesthesia or dysaesthesia at the moment of dural puncture during 'needle through needle' insertion of 26 and 27 gauge pencil-point spinal needles, following the use of either air or saline (4) or an air-saline combination5 to determine loss of resistance and facilitate placement of the epidural needle.
One patient presented with new onset dysaesthesia in the distribution of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve of the opposite leg after hip replacement surgery and was excluded from further analysis.
this includes both frank pain and/ or unpleasant dysaesthesia
The most commonly reported adverse events were bitter taste, headache, and dysaesthesia, and more than 90 percent of the patients completed the study.
20) Chronic pain is experienced by 20 percent to 50 percent of people with MS and may present as paraesthesia, dysaesthesia (burning, throbbing or shooting), hyperaesthesia so that non-painful touch becomes painful, and/ or anaesthesia.
It was demonstrated that corticosteroid therapy is a likely candidate for MM and multiple cranial neuropathies (26,27), and favorable improvement may be seen in painful dysaesthesia of painful sensory neuropathy and radiculoneuropathy forms with IVIg therapy (27,28,29,30).
Mr Atkinson now suf-f fers with numbness and dysaesthesia - an unpleasant pins-and-needles, crawling or burning sensation when touched - in his wrist, palm and left ring finger.
Sensory disturbance may include numbness, paraesthesia (pins and needles) or dysaesthesia (unpleasant burning pain and hypersensitivity).