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dynamic

 [di-nam´ik]
pertaining to or manifesting force.

dynamic

/dy·nam·ic/ (di-nam´ik)
1. pertaining to or manifesting force.
2. of or relating to energy or to objects in motion.
3. characterized by or tending to produce change.

dynamic

[dīnam′ik]
Etymology: Gk, dynamis, force
1 tending to change or to encourage change, such as a dynamic nurse-patient relationship.
2 (in respiratory therapy) a condition of changing volume. Compare static.

dynamic

pertaining to or manifesting force.

dynamic compression plates
used in orthopedic surgery. See compression plating.
References in periodicals archive ?
It must be emphasized though that such dynamical effects are typical of drive design used at the examined locomotive.
which is a non-potential dynamical system of order two.
Section 2 provides the necessary background information on the invariance and conserved quantities of dynamical system and especially the Noether's theorem.
1] the sensitive dependence of the dynamical system on initial conditions in the sense of Guckenhaimer appears immediately from its transitivity and density of the set of its periodic points.
Fuller explorations of complex dynamical systems may deliver a more useful perspective of these co-evolving phenomena, expanding into a deeper and more explicit comprehension of the phenomenon of Life itself
f]> (when removing dynamical contributions as will be discussed later).
The author's focus on continuous evolutionary models of the deterministic variety means that, with the exception of some cursory discussion of the consequences of switching from continuous to discrete formulations of dynamical systems, these modelling issues do not get addressed.
Hirsch, Devaney, and Smale's classic Differential Equations, Dynamical Systems, and an Introduction to Chaos has been used by professors as the primary text for undergraduate and graduate level courses covering differential equations.
These important results demonstrate that powerful dynamical mechanisms (internal waves, magnetic fields, turbulence) are in action to extract angular momentum all along the evolution of stars.
R] is the speed of a clock or rod with respect to the dynamical 3-space, and where c is the speed of light with respect to the dynamical 3-space.
Rather than add yet another to the many good general descriptions of dynamical systems, Bollt and Santitissadeekorn draw connections between topological dynamics, symbolic dynamics, and information theory to show that these are also highly relevant to the Ulam-Galerkin representations.

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