dye


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dye

 [di]
any of various colored substances containing auxochromes and thus capable of coloring substances to which they are applied; used for staining and coloring, as test reagents, and as therapeutic agents.

dye

(),
A stain or coloring matter; a compound consisting of chromophore and auxochrome groups attached to one or more benzene rings, its color being due to the chromophore and its dyeing affinities to the auxochrome. Dyes are used for intravital coloration of cells, staining tissues and microorganisms, as antiseptics and germicides, and some as stimulants of epithelial growth. For individual dyes, see the specific names. Commonly but improperly used for radiographic contrast medium.
[A.S. deah, deag]

dye

(di) any colored substance containing auxochromes and thus capable of coloring substances to which it is applied; used for staining and coloring, as a test reagent, and as a therapeutic agent.
acid dye , acidic dye one which is acidic in reaction and usually unites with positively charged ions of the material acted upon.
amphoteric dye  one containing both reactive basic and reactive acidic groups, and staining both acidic and basic elements.
anionic dye  acid d.
basic dye  one which is basic in reaction and unites with negatively charged ions of the material acted upon.
cationic dye  basic d.

dye

[dī]
Etymology: AS, deag
1 v, to apply coloring to a substance.
2 n, a chemical compound capable of imparting color to a substance to which it is applied. Various dyes are used in medicine as stains for tissues, test reagents, therapeutic agents, and coloring agents in pharmaceutic preparations.

dye

()
A stain or coloring matter; a compound consisting of chromophore and auxochrome groups attached to one or more benzene rings, its color being due to the chromophore and its dyeing affinities to the auxochrome. Dyes are used for intravital coloration of living cells, staining tissues and microorganisms, as antiseptics and germicides, and some as stimulants of epithelial growth. Commonly used term for radiographic contrast medium.
[A.S. deah, deag]

dye

()
A stain or coloring matter. Commonly but improperly used to mean radiographic contrast medium.
[A.S. deah, deag]

dye

any of various colored substances containing auxochromes and thus capable of coloring substances to which they are applied; used for staining and coloring, as test reagents, and as therapeutic agents.

acridine dye
acriflavine and proflavine are antiseptic dyes.
azo dye
dyes like scarlet red and phenazopyridine are used as antiseptics to be applied topically or as urinary antiseptics.
diagnostic dye
several diagnostic test procedures involve the administration of a dye and determination of the rate of excretion, either by measuring levels remaining in the body or amounts excreted in the urine, feces, etc. Examples are the bromsulfthalein (BSP) test for liver function, and the phenolsulfonphthalein (PSP) renal function test.
dye dilution method
the standard method of measuring circulating plasma volume; based on the degree of dilution of a physiologically inert dye injected intravenously.
vital dye
see vital stain.

Patient discussion about dye

Q. Has anyone had an allergic reaction to gadolinium dye, MRI contrast agents, I have had a severe reaction. I would like to know the long term effects of this dye. And if anyone else has had or heard of problems and reactions to it. Please answer me. Thank you

A. In 1969 I almost died from the IVP dye. I had no idea I was allergic and when I awoke I was in a "recovery room." The doctor told me to always tell any physicians/paramedics etc of my allergy status regarding the dye. I now have chronic back pain, have a history of cancer in the family and the doctor wants to do a scan (including dye) but when I emphasized that I was allergic he backed off. Now I am wondering if there is anything else that can be done to test the bone (scan) without the dye. Any answers? Thanks

More discussions about dye
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the major companies operating in the dye sensitized cell market are Dyesol, Ltd.
Mytton wept as Mr Bennetts read out victim impact statements from Mrs Dye and Mr Dye's sister, Katherine Dye.
He told of his time growing up with Mr Dye, a devoted dad to three children.
Such a differential response might be due to difficulty in permeation of dye through the algal membrane [5].
This will prevent the water from pouring out between plates when the mold is disassembled, which will dilute the dye trail left by the leak.
Toxicants work by interfering with cellular respiration, damaging the pathways that cells need to live and grow, so the formation of the purple dye color is either reduced or totally prevented.
Natural fibers like cotton work best, and beware those sewn with a polyester thread, because polyester doesn't take dye at all, so the thread will stay the original color, which is fine if you don't mind it looking like top stitching.
This environmentally friendly, heavy-metal-free organic dye was optimized for mass production by existing spin-coating manufacturing technologies.
Microvasculature can be selectively damaged using dye lasers: A basic theory and experimental evidence in human skin.
NIR dye blend formulated with solid resins such as polycarbonate, acrylics, SAN, etc are offered to customers as palletized product suitable for injection molding and/or extrusion.
The American Pregnancy Association, however, said it was unlikely that hair dye could harm an unborn baby - too little of the chemicals would reach it - although it did say that pregnant women should avoid strong chemical fumes from ammonia in dye and might want to wait to get their hair dyed until the second trimester.