dwarf

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dwarf

 [dworf]
an abnormally undersized person; see also dwarfism. adj., adj dwar´�fish.
hypophysial dwarf pituitary dwarf.
hypothyroid dwarf a dwarf with hypothyroidism or cretinism. See dwarfism.
infantile dwarf a dwarf with infantilism.
normal dwarf an individual who is undersized but perfectly formed.
pituitary dwarf a person with pituitary dwarfism; called also hypophyseal dwarf.
renal dwarf a person with renal dwarfism.

dwarf

(dwōrf), Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
An abnormally undersized person with disproportion among the body parts. See: dwarfism.
[A.S. dweorh]

dwarf

(dworf) an abnormally short person.dwarf´ish
achondroplastic dwarf  one with achondroplasia and a large head with saddle nose and brachycephaly, short limbs, and usually lordosis.
Amsterdam dwarf  one with de Lange's syndrome.
ateliotic dwarf  one with infantile skeleton, with persistent nonunion between epiphyses and diaphyses.
hypophysial dwarf  pituitary d.
Laron dwarf  one whose skeletal growth retardation is from impaired ability to synthesize insulin-like growth factor I, usually due to growth hormone receptor defects.
normal dwarf , physiologic dwarf a person who is unusually short but not deformed.
pituitary dwarf  a dwarf with hypophysial infantilism.
rachitic dwarf  a person dwarfed by rickets, having a high forehead with prominent bosses, bent long bones, and Harrison's groove.
renal dwarf  one whose failure to achieve normal bone maturation is due to renal failure.
true dwarf  normal d.

dwarf

(dwôrf)
n. pl. dwarfs or dwarves (dwôrvz)
a. A person with a usually genetic disorder resulting in atypically short stature and often disproportionate limbs.
b. An atypically small animal or plant.

dwarf′ish adj.

dwarf

[dwôrf]
Etymology: AS, dweorge
2 v, to prevent or retard, for example, normal growth.
A preferred term for a person of diminutive size resulting from dwarfism or of various causes

dwarf

(dwōrf)
An abnormally undersized person with disproportion among the bodily parts.
See: dwarfism

dwarf

(dwōrf)
An abnormally undersized person with disproportion among the body parts.

dwarf

an abnormally undersized animal or plant. See also dwarfism.

dwarf bay
daphnemezereum.
dwarf cattle
dwarf Darling pea
swainsonaluteola.
dolichocephalic dwarf
dwarf with a long, narrow head.
dwarf elder
sambucusebulus.
dwarf goat
a dwarf variety of any of the standard goat breeds; the best known is a dwarf of West African breed.
dwarf laurel
kalmiaangustifolia.
proportional dwarf
see proportional dwarf.
dwarf tapeworm
see hymenolepisnana.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its biggest weakness might be the assumption that the chemical composition of dwarf stars is the same in elliptical galaxies as in the Milky Way.
Since red dwarf stars are smaller than a star like the Sun, which is classified as a yellow dwarf, the habitable zone is smaller but this new study expands the zone surrounding these parent stars.
Compared to what's out there in places such as white dwarf stars, the magnetic fields we can generate here -- even with the strongest magnets -- are pathetic.
This cosmic gemstone is in fact a white dwarf star, or the slowly cooling remnant of a star that once was a little more massive than our Sun.
Although the closest habitable planet might orbit a red dwarf star, the closest one we can easily prove to be life-bearing might orbit a white dwarf.
All these solutions involve a white dwarf star that somehow increases in mass to the highest limit.
Using the Keck I telescope in Hawaii, Ben Zuckerman of UCLA and colleagues found that each of two polluted white dwarf stars snarfed at least 10 quadrillion metric tons of rocky dust.
Using publicly available data from NASA's Kepler space telescope, astronomers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) have found that six percent of red dwarf stars have habitable, Earth-sized planets.
About six percent of the red dwarf stars in our galaxy have an Earth-sized planet at the right distance for liquid water to persist, scientists estimate in a new study.
Dwarf stars such as GJ 436, which is less than half the sun's mass, are the most common stars.
Dwarf stars are the most common type of star in the galaxy, and the discovery suggests new places to search for life, Udry says.
London, September 28 ( ANI ): The supernova explosion of the year 1006 - the brightest stellar event ever recorded in history - was probably caused by the merger of two white dwarf stars, scientists have found.