dwarf

(redirected from dwarf stars)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

dwarf

 [dworf]
an abnormally undersized person; see also dwarfism. adj., adj dwar´�fish.
hypophysial dwarf pituitary dwarf.
hypothyroid dwarf a dwarf with hypothyroidism or cretinism. See dwarfism.
infantile dwarf a dwarf with infantilism.
normal dwarf an individual who is undersized but perfectly formed.
pituitary dwarf a person with pituitary dwarfism; called also hypophyseal dwarf.
renal dwarf a person with renal dwarfism.

dwarf

(dwōrf), Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
An abnormally undersized person with disproportion among the body parts. See: dwarfism.
[A.S. dweorh]

dwarf

(dworf) an abnormally short person.dwarf´ish
achondroplastic dwarf  one with achondroplasia and a large head with saddle nose and brachycephaly, short limbs, and usually lordosis.
Amsterdam dwarf  one with de Lange's syndrome.
ateliotic dwarf  one with infantile skeleton, with persistent nonunion between epiphyses and diaphyses.
hypophysial dwarf  pituitary d.
Laron dwarf  one whose skeletal growth retardation is from impaired ability to synthesize insulin-like growth factor I, usually due to growth hormone receptor defects.
normal dwarf , physiologic dwarf a person who is unusually short but not deformed.
pituitary dwarf  a dwarf with hypophysial infantilism.
rachitic dwarf  a person dwarfed by rickets, having a high forehead with prominent bosses, bent long bones, and Harrison's groove.
renal dwarf  one whose failure to achieve normal bone maturation is due to renal failure.
true dwarf  normal d.

dwarf

(dwôrf)
n. pl. dwarfs or dwarves (dwôrvz)
a. A person with a usually genetic disorder resulting in atypically short stature and often disproportionate limbs.
b. An atypically small animal or plant.

dwarf′ish adj.

dwarf

[dwôrf]
Etymology: AS, dweorge
2 v, to prevent or retard, for example, normal growth.
A preferred term for a person of diminutive size resulting from dwarfism or of various causes

dwarf

(dwōrf)
An abnormally undersized person with disproportion among the bodily parts.
See: dwarfism

dwarf

(dwōrf)
An abnormally undersized person with disproportion among the body parts.

dwarf

an abnormally undersized animal or plant. See also dwarfism.

dwarf bay
daphnemezereum.
dwarf cattle
dwarf Darling pea
swainsonaluteola.
dolichocephalic dwarf
dwarf with a long, narrow head.
dwarf elder
sambucusebulus.
dwarf goat
a dwarf variety of any of the standard goat breeds; the best known is a dwarf of West African breed.
dwarf laurel
kalmiaangustifolia.
proportional dwarf
see proportional dwarf.
dwarf tapeworm
see hymenolepisnana.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bean and Kempton looked at the light spectrum signature from the large planet as it passed in front of the dwarf star, and the result led to two possible conclusions: steam bath or haze.
In this study, we found that a supernova was the result of the interaction between a white dwarf star and a companion star made of helium.
Statistically, this means that six percent of all red dwarf stars should have an Earth-like planet.
Pont says he's optimistic that the search for planets that eclipse dwarf stars will soon identify one with the right stuff--the proper composition and temperature for life.
This is the first time that such low proportions of carbon have been measured in the atmospheres of white dwarf stars polluted by debris.
A decade ago, researchers had ruled out dwarf stars as hosts of habitable worlds, notes astronomer Jill Tarter of the SETI Institute in Mountain View, Calif.
A radio telescope at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico picked them up on May 12 while checking out red dwarf stars that have planets orbiting them, as part of a project to learn more about the "radiation and magnetic environments around the stars or even hint the presence of new sub-stellar objects, including planets.
Two Princeton researchers recently contemplated that we really might be alone in the universe, but the study of red dwarf stars in the Milky Way discovered nine super-Earths - and two in the 'habitable zone' where liquid water could exist.
So, says Lissauer, "while it is likely that some of the hundreds of billions of M dwarf stars in our galaxy have planets with temperatures, masses, and compositions similar to Earth's, the number of such planets is probably small, and Sun-like stars, despite being considerably less numerous, may well be the hosts of far more habitable planets.
Astronomers at the Space Telescope Science Institute used observations from the Hubble Space telescope to test and ultimately confirm Einstein's general theory of relativity and use it to calculate the mass of white dwarf stars.
London, Apr 12 ( ANI ): In a new study, astronomers have identified two white dwarf stars considered to be the oldest and closest known to man.
who improved on methods of assessing the age of brown dwarf stars from their near-infrared spectra.