duty


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to duty: customs duty, Duty cycle, Duty free

duty

Etymology: ME, duete, conduct
(in law) an obligation owed by one party to another. Duty may be established by statute or other legal process, as by contract or oath supported by statute, or it may be voluntarily undertaken. Every person has a duty of care to all other people to prevent causing harm or injury by negligence.

negligence

Medical malpractice The failure or alleged failure on the part of a physician or other health care provider to exercise ordinary, reasonable, usual, or expected care, prudence, or skill–that would usually and customarily be exercised by other reputable physicians treating similar Pts–in performing a legally recognized duty, resulting in forseeable harm, injury or loss to another; negligence may be an act of omission–ie, unintentional, or commission–ie, intentional, characterized by inattention, recklessness, inadvertence, thoughtlessness, or wantonness. See Adverse event, Comparative negligence, Contributory negligence, Gross negligence, Malpractice, Wanton negligence, Willful negligence. Cf Recklessness.
Negligence, required elements  
Duty A recognized relationship between Pt and physician
Breach Failure of a medical practitioner to practice in accordance with standard of care
Proximate cause The plaintiff must show that injury is reasonably connected to physician's action
Damages Plaintiff must show that alleged loss or damage has a quantifiable value such that a monetary payment can be made APLM 1997; 121:252

duty

(doo′tē, dū′)
A social, professional, legal, or ethical expectation that compels a standard of performance; an obligation or requirement.

duty,

n that which is due from a person; that which a person owes to another; an obligation.
References in classic literature ?
With his own ghostly voice he had exhorted me, on the sacred consideration of my filial duty and reverence towards him -- who might reasonably regard himself as my official ancestor -- to bring his mouldy and moth-eaten lucubrations before the public.
At least, I never heard he was employed about any publication, and, to own the truth, he does not appear to me to be particularly qualified for such a duty, either by native capacity, or, its substitute, education.
I would be a poor wife for an English lord were I to be responsible for his shirking a plain duty.
In three minutes the Vicar was on horseback again, having gone magnanimously through a duty much harder than the renunciation of whist, or even than the writing of penitential meditations.
And I was very ill grieved, Miss Grey; but I went to my seat, and I tried to do my duty as aforetime: but I like got no peace.
The cardinal duty of a dog was to serve his white god by keeping a vigilant eye on all blacks that came about.
By conscience and courage, by deeds of devotion and daring, he soon commended himself to his fellows and his officers; and it was to these qualities and to some knowledge of the country that he owed his selection for his present perilous duty at the extreme outpost.
Now or never was the time to decide what it was my duty to my husband and my duty to myself to do next.
Duty finds me earnest; Duty finds me cheerful; Duty finds me accessible.
And I have decided that it is my duty to broach the subject to Leslie.
The baby is left to an old woman whose duty it is to look after babies collectively.
Huntingdon, I should think it my absolute duty to inform her husband of the circumstance - or awaken his suspicions at least - however painful it might be, or however dreadful the consequences.