duress


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duress

[dyo̅o̅res′]
Etymology: L, durus, hard
(in law) an action compelling another person to do what he or she would not do voluntarily. A consent form signed under duress is not valid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Traditionally, the doctrine of duress applied only when the contract was signed under physical coercion or threat.
Given that economic duress is a court-made concept, courts could also loosen or even suspend the wrongful-act requirement in the forced-arbitration context, where the equities so strongly favor the claimant.
A complete demo of the solution showcasing integrated video with Enterprise Mobile Duress will be on display in Inovonics' booth #16109 at ISC West.
Share This Story: #Inovonics to demo integrated video & Enterprise Mobile Duress #EMD solution with @milestonesys at #ISCW2014 #security
Before proceeding to analyze "duress" under Article 31 of the Rome Statute in Part II, this Part will trace the historical development of duress jurisprudence through five major categories: (i) common law systems; (ii) civil law systems; (iii) World War II/IMT case law; (iv) the Model Penal Code; and (v) the Erdemovic decision of the ICTY Appeals Chamber.
The general consensus among the common law legal systems of the world is that duress cannot be used to excuse murder.
In recent years, an increasing number of courts and legal scholars have argued for the allowance of duress as a defense to a broader range of crimes, including murder.
Vasquez, the SJC addressed the issue of duress as an affirmative defense to intentional murder.
Historically, contractual duress was applied in narrowly circumscribed situations.
In addition to the evolution of duress from a contract law standpoint, the law of duress has also developed from a criminal law basis.
8220;We have seen an increase in the type of user deploying Ekahau's Wi-Fi based RTLS over the last 12 months, including schools deploying RTLS for personal duress alarms for their teachers and asset tracking; Retail to track their staff and mobile barcode scanners; Hotels to track their housekeepers and porters; through to hospitals and age care facilities tracking medical equipment, patients and for personal duress alarms for their staff,” Mark said.
Scholars have extensively examined whether necessity and duress are properly understood as excused or justified acts.