dualism

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Related to dualistic: Dualistic theory

du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm),
1. In chemistry, a theory advanced by Berzelius that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; still applicable, with modification, to polar compounds, but inapplicable to nonpolar compounds.
2. In hematology, the concept that blood cells have two origins, that is, lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]

dualism

(do͞o′ə-lĭz′əm, dyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The condition of being double; duality.
2. Psychology The view that mental and physical properties are fundamentally different and that neither can be explained fully in terms of the other.

du′al·ist n.
du′al·is′tic adj.
du′al·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm)
1. chemistry theory that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; applicable to polar compounds but not to nonpolar compounds.
2. hematology the concept that blood cells have two origins, i.e., lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]

dualism

(doo'a-lizm, du'a) [L. dualis, containing two + -ism]
1. The condition of being double or twofold.
2. The theory that human beings consist of two entities, mind and matter, that are independent of each other. Synonym: mind-body duality
3. The theory that various blood cells arise from two types of stem cells: myeloblasts, giving rise to the myeloid elements, and lymphoblasts, giving rise to the lymphoid elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Irigaray affirms the need for thinking the relational self, she also insists on a dualistic conception of self: there is in addition to the relational self an individual self.
First, while Carter seeks to defend a form of dualistic interactionism, he seems not to acknowledge that dualistic interactionism is logically compatible with one of the claims that he associates with materialism, namely that consciousness depends on a functioning brain.
Americans who have accepted dualistic assumptions often find it unacceptable to accord those suspected of crimes, even of great and horrible crimes, due legal process.
Although still starting college at the dualistic developmental stage, the majority of freshmen are now part of Generation Y, born in or after 1982 and also known as the 'Net Generation or the Digital Generation due to their technological prowess.
This dualistic framework is problematic, and may undermine the long-term change these groups desire.
Here Abrams examines what he sees as the Thoreauvian critique of dualistic geography.
George Corbett's book, Dante and Epicurus: A Dualistic Vision of Secular and Spiritual Fulfilment, sounds a call to reappraise Dante's Commedia in dualistic terms.
In the legal form of the SE, the company will continue to operate with a dualistic system consisting of the Executive Board and the Supervisory Board.
The Spanish author describes political institutions at the national level, including the duties performed by the symbolic monarchy, then addresses the regional decentralization allowed under the Estado de las Autonomias, the dualistic structure of the court system, and the numerous fundamental rights defined in the Constitution.
It critically looks at historic and current dualistic approaches to nature.
ISLAMABAD -- Residents of federal capital have protested against dualistic policy of Capital Development Authority (CDA) in regard of non-provision of basic facilities in some particular sectors.
In its role as an annual calendar, a pattern of alternating pit depths hints at the adjacent months, which may have been paired in some way, potentially reflecting some sort of dualistic cosmological belief system - known in the ethnographic and historical record in many parts of the world, but not detected archaeologically from the Stone Age.