dualism

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du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm),
1. In chemistry, a theory advanced by Berzelius that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; still applicable, with modification, to polar compounds, but inapplicable to nonpolar compounds.
2. In hematology, the concept that blood cells have two origins, that is, lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]

dualism

(do͞o′ə-lĭz′əm, dyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The condition of being double; duality.
2. Psychology The view that mental and physical properties are fundamentally different and that neither can be explained fully in terms of the other.

du′al·ist n.
du′al·is′tic adj.
du′al·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm)
1. chemistry theory that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; applicable to polar compounds but not to nonpolar compounds.
2. hematology the concept that blood cells have two origins, i.e., lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]

dualism

(doo'a-lizm, du'a) [L. dualis, containing two + -ism]
1. The condition of being double or twofold.
2. The theory that human beings consist of two entities, mind and matter, that are independent of each other. Synonym: mind-body duality
3. The theory that various blood cells arise from two types of stem cells: myeloblasts, giving rise to the myeloid elements, and lymphoblasts, giving rise to the lymphoid elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
95), yet they overlook the importance of personal identity when they turn to assess monist and dualist versions of human persons (p.
Peculiarly, More the philosophical dualist values the inner life that gives rise to "intuitions" of theism, moral choice and responsibility, but is anti-mystical.
The dualist or Manichaean and Gnostic elements of the Albigensian heresy are conceived as having survived in some underground form through hundreds of years from the first Christian centuries and to have arrived in Languedoc from across a relatively immense geographical reach since the traditional area of influence of the religion of Mani and the Gnostic sects was Persia.
He wasn't a dualist, and he argued that the soul died with the body.
The dualist ascesis undertaken in the hope of a visionary illumination, the separation of mind from body, the pervasive "enthusiasm," and the resulting sense of empowerment and certainty: all these suggest that Descartes's reading had led him to the writings of Hermes.
Ackerman argues that the American Constitution is dualist rather than rights foundationalist.
Sahej Bakshi aka Dualist Inquiry, too, believes in the possibility of a spontaneous collaboration.
This is because, after starting with papers discussing the basic dualist mental architecture, the collection moves to applications of the approach, in effect covering the range of the ways in which the program has made itself felt.
For instance, Nagatomo seemingly takes on a classically dualist stance by stating that ".
The strongest chapters are 1 and 2, in which the society of Aquitaine during 1000-1150 is skillfully integrated into the dualist heresy of the region.
Khayyat, Abu 'Ali al-Jubba'i, Shahrastani) is accused of being a dualist of some sort--is careful and precise.
Kant's "pure practical reason," which masters its "pathological impulses," is a philosopher's creation, a fiction of a dualist philosophical anthropology.