dualism


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du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm),
1. In chemistry, a theory advanced by Berzelius that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; still applicable, with modification, to polar compounds, but inapplicable to nonpolar compounds.
2. In hematology, the concept that blood cells have two origins, that is, lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]

dualism

(do͞o′ə-lĭz′əm, dyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The condition of being double; duality.
2. Psychology The view that mental and physical properties are fundamentally different and that neither can be explained fully in terms of the other.

du′al·ist n.
du′al·is′tic adj.
du′al·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

du·al·ism

(dū'ăl-izm)
1. chemistry theory that every compound, no matter how many elements enter into it, is composed of two parts, one electrically negative, the other positive; applicable to polar compounds but not to nonpolar compounds.
2. hematology the concept that blood cells have two origins, i.e., lymphogenous and myelogenous.
3. The theory that the mind and body are two distinct systems, independent and different in nature.
[L. dualis, relating to two, fr. duo, two]

dualism

(doo'a-lizm, du'a) [L. dualis, containing two + -ism]
1. The condition of being double or twofold.
2. The theory that human beings consist of two entities, mind and matter, that are independent of each other. Synonym: mind-body duality
3. The theory that various blood cells arise from two types of stem cells: myeloblasts, giving rise to the myeloid elements, and lymphoblasts, giving rise to the lymphoid elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
A student eloquently articulated the dangers dualism poses to spiritual life through avoidance of personal responsibility:
It is precisely upon this epistemological horizon that Corbett's analyses plumb the depth of the dualism for which he argues so compellingly.
John Eccles and Daniel Robinson defended dualism in 1984 in their The Wonder of Being Human: Our Brain and Our Mind (New York: Macmillan, 1984).
Irigaray, on the other hand, uses the self/other and male/female split to highlight the de-privileged ones within the coupling and establish the importance of dualism in her ethics of sexual difference.
Alexander Rehding considers dualism as resulting from a dialectic in the manner of Hauptmann.
We are not told if this use of spirit is specifically intended to distinguish his view from Platonic dualism, or if he is merely appealing to a popular evangelical audience.
She is the author of Exploring Shamanism, Traveling Between the Worlds: Conversations with Contemporary Shamans, and Yanantin and Masintin in the Andean World: Complementary Dualism in Modern Peru.
While the chapters on African American dualisms and migration narratives are distinguished by their insightful reconsideration of mostly well known African American literary texts, the chapter on African American writers, bohemia, and the new poetry stands out for its detailed social and intellectual history of interracial bohemian urban districts such as Chicago's Towertown and New York's Greenwich Village.
This extreme dualism was not present at the beginning of the Bible (Genesis 1), which well over half of the world (Jews, Christians, and Muslims) looks upon as God's revelation.
s use of conceptual metaphor theory advances a constructive theology that binds together abstract concepts with practical consequences, frequently subverting binary structures, beginning with an outright challenge to the category of dualism, followed by an analysis of other suspect and oppressive hierarchies.
In Mere Christianity, Lewis defines philosophical dualism as "the belief that there are two equal and independent powers at the back if everything, one of them good and the other bad, and that this universe is the battlefield in which they fight out an endless war" (42).
Lowe's dualism does not share all of the liabilities of Cartesian dualism.