dual relationships

du·al re·la·tion·ships

relationships in which a health service provider is concurrently participating in two or more role categories with a patient; such dual relationships may be benign (as when both are members of the same social group) or exploitive (a sexual relationship).

du·al re·la·tion·ships

(dūăl rĕ-lāshŭn-ships)
Relationships in which a health service provider is concurrently participating in two or more role categories with a patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
Almost half of the inquiries (609) regarded issues of confidentiality, and another quarter (305) regarded issues of the counseling relationship, which includes dual relationships (Hubert & Freeman, 2004).
The code's standards on boundary issues and dual relationships will be used to illustrate this classroom process.
The physician's episodic creation of these dual relationships was thus connected with his medical practice and "immoral or unprofessional conduct in the practice of medicine.
Conflicts involving dual relationships between mental health professionals and inmates are discussed in several areas.
Avoiding dual relationships (social or financial) with the patient.
Unfortunately, working on this project with your therapist is problematic, according to the American Psychological Association, which advises therapists to avoid forming dual relationships with their patients.
02(h)], avoiding dual relationships when there is a risk of exploitation or potential harm to the client [5.
They should avoid such dual relationships and always be available for advice and counsel to all parties in any conflict situation.
Such dual relationships are often unethical because they violate privacy, exert a negative influence on the accuracy of the interpretation, and place a strain on the relationship between the interpreter and the client.
Dual relationships are defined as engaging in the therapy relationship as well as one or more additional relationships with that individual or one related to, or closely associated with, the client.
Hatcher's postings, including an October installment examining dual relationships between counselors and clients, have become much-discussed case studies on the ethical dilemmas facing addiction treatment organizations and clinicians.
Another category similarly influenced by descriptive style was dual relationships.

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