dual relationships

du·al re·la·tion·ships

relationships in which a health service provider is concurrently participating in two or more role categories with a patient; such dual relationships may be benign (as when both are members of the same social group) or exploitive (a sexual relationship).

du·al re·la·tion·ships

(dūăl rĕ-lāshŭn-ships)
Relationships in which a health service provider is concurrently participating in two or more role categories with a patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
As already noted, for example, the mental health professions have clearly elucidated the issues and problems associated with dual relationships between therapist and client.
Guideline 6b, which specifically cautions against dual relationships, reads as follows:
The Board's expert opined that "all dual relationships are unethical.
There are, of course, parts of the list that get repeated over and over: confidentiality of client information, dual relationships with clients, sexual relationships with clients, and duties to report in cases of suicidal/homicidal (with an identified target) ideation.
In this article, challenges in fieldwork related to professionals' scope of practice, interdisciplinary turf battles, interpersonal boundaries and dual relationships, compassion fatigue, and cultural competence are highlighted.
For example, on one hand, the ACA (1995) Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice discourages dual relationships such as engaging in social activities with clients (Section A.
Dual relationships occur primarily between social workers and their current or former clients and between social workers and their colleagues (including supervisees and students).
Gottlieb's decision-making model (35) recognizes that trying to avoid all dual relationships is unrealistic and not all dual relationships are exploitative.
Among their topics are moral development and ethical decision making in social work practice, confidentiality and the duty to warn and protect, paternalism, and dual relationships.
Specifically, they spoke of concerns about dual relationships, fiduciary issues, supervisees selecting their own supervisors, and their own training and competence for sanctioned supervision.
reading the code of ethics and even through the teaching of new counselors, and you know, we stress the whole dual relationships, and, you know, conflict of interest and confidentiality .
Chapters 4 through 9 focus on specific challenges in adolescent psychotherapy, including resistance, confidentiality, diagnosis, and dual relationships.