drowning

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drowning

 [drown´ing]
death from suffocation resulting from aspiration of water or other substance or fluid. Drowning occurs because the liquid prevents breathing. The lungs of a drowned person may contain very little water or other liquid.

First aid measures are begun as soon as the individual is rescued from the water. Blankets and other coverings are used only to prevent loss of body heat. artificial respiration or other appropriate respiratory support should be administered at once to anyone who has stopped breathing. A victim who is unconscious but still breathing should be placed in a reclining position, preferably on the side. If the victim is not breathing and there is no evidence of a heart beat, cardiopulmonary resuscitation is begun immediately.

drown·ing

(drown'ing), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation drownding.
Death within 24 hours of immersion in liquid, either due to anoxia or cardiac arrest caused by sudden extreme lowering of temperature (immersion syndrome).
See also: near drowning.

drowning

/drown·ing/ (droun´ing) suffocation and death resulting from filling of the lungs with water or other substance.

drowning

Etymology: ME, drounen
asphyxiation caused by submersion in a liquid. See also near drowning.
Death from asphyxia caused by a liquid entering the lungs and preventing the absorption of oxygen leading to cerebral hypoxia and cardiac arrest
Epidemiology Drowning claims 7,000 lives/year (US), comprising 15% of non-MVA deaths; 90% of decedents were hypoxic
Management The ‘standard’ ABCs of CPR are recommended, accompanied by intubation, placement of an IV line, if necessary, and use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), treatment of hyperthermia; the abdominal thrust maneuver—see there—is no longer recommended for routine use
Prognosis The main priority in near-drowning is to prevent brain injury; parameters that adversely influence ‘intact’ survival include delays in initiating CPR, severe metabolic acidosis—pH < 7.1—asystole on arrival to the hospital, fixed and dilated pupils, and a low—< 5—Glasgow score

drowning

Public health A mechanism of death that claims 7000 lives/yr–US, comprising 15% of non-MVA deaths; death is by asphyxia due to submersion, with aspiration of fluid; 90% of decedents were hypoxic. See Fresh water drowning, Salt water drowning, Wet drowning.
Drowning
Fresh water drowning Hypoosmolar water affects the surface tension of alveolar surfactant, causing an imbalance in the V/Q ratio with a collapse of some alveoli, resulting in both true (absolute) and relative intrapulmonary shunting; the V/Q abnormality is further compromised by pulmonary edema; the shifts of fluids and electrolytes in fresh water drowning result in hemodilution, hemolysis, circulatory overload, and hyponatremia
Salt water drowning Sea water aspiration results in fluid-filled but perfused alveoli, accompanied by a V/Q abnormality due to pulmonary edema; the shifts of fluids and electrolytes in salt water drowning result in hemoconcentration, CHF, and hypernatremia

drown·ing

(drow'ning)
Death from suffocation induced by immersion in water or other fluid, with filling of pulmonary air spaces and passages with fluid to the detriment of gas exchange.
[M.E. drounen]

drowning

Death from suffocation as a result of exclusion of air from the lungs by fluid, usually water. This may result from fluid produced within the lungs themselves (pulmonary oedema).

drown·ing

(drow'ning)
Death within 24 hours of immersion in liquid, either due to anoxia or cardiac arrest.
[M.E. drounen]

drowning,

n asphyxiation because of submersion in a liquid.

drowning

death from suffocation resulting from aspiration of water or other substance or fluid. Drowning occurs because the liquid prevents breathing.

dry-drowning
asphyxiation, but with little or no inhalation of water as a result of persistent laryngospasm.
near-drowning
secondary drowning
pulmonary edema may occur some time after a near-drowning due to loss of surfactant.