drupe


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drupe

a type of succulent, fleshy fruit produced by some plants in which the seed is enclosed in a hard, woody ‘stone’. The fruit is formed from the swollen tissue of the PERICARP. Examples include peach, plum, cherry, olive, apricot.
References in periodicals archive ?
The drupe app is a people-centric app that works as an overlay layer focused on a user's contacts, allowing users to drag and drop contacts with one swipe in order to communicate.
Results showed significant differences within 5 olive cultivars in terms of leaf surface drupe mean weight and oil yield.
Loconsolo Memorial Fund, 329 Apple Drupe Way, Holly Springs, NC.
2) In a word, what Ibn Battuta describes is paan, the two main ingredients of which are leaves of the betel (Piper betle) and the dried drupe of areca (Areca catechu).
The fruit is a drupe, marble-sized, light yellow at maturity, hanging on the tree all winter, and gradually becoming wrinkled and almost white.
So how have commercial printers on the drupe panel responded to these challenges?
Its yellow or orange fruit is a globose drupe and is approximately three centimeters in diameter with a thin exocarp and fibrous mesocarp, like a coconut with juicy, sweet flesh that surrounds a single seed (LORENZI et al.
Within, I'm quandary, a drupe stapled by bees, a sink full of mastic plates.
We are pleased to have been involved with this award-winning package, which was exhibited on the HP stand at drupe.
The fruit is a more or less compressed, fleshy drupe.
The inflorescence is a compact and erect panicle, the flowers are small and greenish white, and the fruit is a villose, reddish, 1-seeded drupe (Davis, 1967).
Because practitioners in the sciences need precision when speaking or writing formally, the botanical term of choice for both true seeds as well as those carrying extra parts is disseminule, a catchall term that covers all variations of reproductive packages, botanically known by terms such as aril, achene, capsule, caryopsis, nut, drupe, and true seed (Figure 4).