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tym·pan·ic mem·brane

[TA]
a thin tense membrane forming the greater part of the lateral wall of the tympanic cavity and separating it from the external acoustic meatus; it constitutes the boundary between the external and middle ears; it is a trilaminar membrane covered with skin on its external surface, mucosa in its internal surface, is covered on both surfaces with epithelium, and, in the tense part, has an intermediate layer of outer radial and inner circular collagen fibers.

drum

(drum) tympanic membrane.

drum

(drŭm)
n.
Anatomy The eardrum.

tym·pan·ic mem·brane

(tim-pan'ik mem'brān) [TA]
A thin, tense covering that forms the greater part of the lateral wall of the tympanic cavity and separates it from the external acoustic meatus; it constitutes the boundary between the external and middle ear, is covered on both surfaces with epithelium, and in the tense part has an intermediate layer of outer radial and inner circular collagen fibers.
Synonym(s): membrana tympani [TA] , drum membrane, drum, drumhead, eardrum, myringa, myrinx.
[L. membrana tympani]
References in classic literature ?
They laid their burden before the earthen drum and then squatted there beside it as guards, while the other members of the community curled themselves in grassy nooks to sleep until the rising moon should give the signal for the commencement of their savage orgy.
Before the drum sat three old females, each armed with a knotted branch fifteen or eighteen inches in length.
Slowly and softly they began tapping upon the resounding surface of the drum as the first faint rays of the ascending moon silvered the encircling tree tops.
As the din of the drum rose to almost deafening volume Kerchak sprang into the open space between the squatting males and the drummers.
The din of the drum was now increased, as well as the frequency of the blows, and the warriors, as each approached the victim of the hunt and delivered his bludgeon blow, joined in the mad whirl of the Death Dance.
After the drum was quiet and the bellies of the tribe well-filled he would hail them.
As the moon declined slowly toward the lofty, foliaged horizon of the amphitheater the booming of the drum decreased and lessened were the exertions of the dancers, until, at last, the final note was struck and the huge beasts turned to fall upon the feast they had dragged hither for the orgy.
At the old man's word and outstretched arm, the roll of the drum was hushed at once, and the advancing line stood still.
Behind Monet and Debussy the umbrella persisted, with the steady beat of a drum.
The lady of the caravan then bade him come up the steps likewise, but the drum proving an inconvenient table for two, they descended again, and sat upon the grass, where she handed down to them the tea-tray, the bread and butter, the knuckle of ham, and in short everything of which she had partaken herself, except the bottle which she had already embraced an opportunity of slipping into her pocket.
Their patroness then shut the door and sat herself down by her drum at an open window; and, the steps being struck by George and stowed under the carriage, away they went, with a great noise of flapping and creaking and straining, and the bright brass knocker, which nobody ever knocked at, knocking one perpetual double knock of its own accord as they jolted heavily along.
Thankfully, at the urging of his many fans and students, Olatunji managed to write his autobiography before he moved on to that great drum circle in the sky.