druggable

druggable

, drugable (drŭg′ă-bĕl)
1. Amenable to treatment with drugs or susceptible to alteration or manipulation with drugs.
2. In genetics, pert. to the ability of a molecule to regulate the function of an endogenous protein for the benefit of the organism.
druggabilitydrugability (-bil′ĭt-ē)
References in periodicals archive ?
Since Grp17 is part of the so-called G-protein-coupled receptor family, it is highly druggable.
The inventory has been bioinformatically characterized into druggable targets i.
Reaxys Medicinal Chemistry sources its data from a vast repository of peer-reviewed journal articles, patents and regulatory information, encompassing millions of compounds and associated biological data linked to thousands of druggable proteins.
The genome networks has been noted as a new approach in developing new drugs through discovery of druggable genome by analyzing genomes which are tumor-inducing and leads to the spread of diseases.
MATRICS will identify new potentially druggable targets, develop novel animal models and conduct pilot medication and neuro/biofeedback studies in high-risk and CD patients.
GTCbio's upcoming 2nd Protein-Protein Interaction Conference to be held on October 23-24, 2014 in Boston, MA will have sessions that cover novel techniques, new algorithms and databases for PPIs, and potential druggable sites for disrupting protein-protein interactions.
This collaborative study exemplifies exactly what our coalition was formed to do -- leverage our individual institution's expertise to collectively discover new druggable targets through genome sequencing and functional genomic analysis.
Specifically, Prosetta's proprietary CFPSS allows detection of highly druggable protein-protein interactions that have not previously been identified.
This multi-faceted approach aims to (i) identify druggable targets and identify reagents to interfere with pathways contributing to depression and anxiety, and (ii) produce novel tools to image depression-associated events in brain, facilitating earlier diagnosis and intervention.
While antibody technologies are steadily evolving, the spectrum of druggable targets for monoclonal antibodies has remained limited to extracellular antigens, albeit including proteins, carbohydrates and glycolipids.
The druggable targets should be amenable to high throughput screening, in silico analyses and other drug discovery methodologies, which in turn, will lead to innovative therapies.
In other words, there is a large gap between what we are attacking (called druggable molecules) and what we might be attacking (undruggable) with drugs made to react with a certain portion of a particular molecule.