drug-induced liver injury


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drug-induced liver injury

Abbreviation: DILI.
Hepatic inflammation, hepatocellular necrosis, or jaundice due to exposure to a medication or toxin. The most common cause of DILI is an overdose of acetaminophen, but many other medications can damage liver cells and produce signs, symptoms, and laboratory findings suggestive of cholestasis or hepatitis.
See also: injury
References in periodicals archive ?
The current study examined inhibiting the action of liver-specific gap junctions to limit drug-induced liver injury.
Circulating microRNAs, potential biomarkers for drug-induced liver injury.
Fontana is part of the National Institutes of Health-funded Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network (DILIN), a multicenter, prospective registry looking at the etiologies, risk factors, and outcomes of DILI in the United States (Drug Saf.
Given the rising use of both HM and CM, data regarding the prevalence of resulting drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is important for patients and practitioners alike.
Drug-induced liver injury (DILI), which includes anything from mild biochemical abnormalities to liver failure, is the primary adverse effect that causes pharmaceutical companies to shelve a new drug or take an older one off the market.
Toxicant- or drug-induced liver injury is a potential complication of nearly every medication (Lee 1995).
The most noteworthy abstracts in the areas of hepatitis C, inflammatory bowel disease, fecal microbiota transplantation for Clostridium difficile, drug-induced liver injury, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, as well as several case reports warning about the dangers of nutritional supplements are discussed in these virtual press briefings, which are available for instant access on the new ACG Blog (http://acgblog.
The prospective study used data from the Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network (DILIN).
Drug-induced liver injury also continues to be a significant problem (Bissell et al.
of the Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences has been selected for an Agilent Thought Leader Award to support his work developing methods to predict drug-induced liver injury.

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