affinity

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affinity

 [ah-fin´ĭ-te]
1. attraction; a tendency to seek out or unite with another object or substance.
2. in chemistry, the tendency of two substances to form strong or weak chemical bonds forming molecules or complexes.
3. in immunology, the thermodynamic bond strength of an antigen-antibody complex.

af·fin·i·ty (A),

(ă-fin'i-tē),
1. In chemistry, the force that impels certain atoms or molecules to bind to or unite with certain other atoms or molecules to form complexes or compounds; chemical attraction.
2. Selective staining of a tissue by a dye or the selective uptake of a dye, chemical, or other substance by a tissue.
3. In psychology and psychiatry, a positive bond or relatedness between people or groups, or a person's positive regard for an object, idea, or activity; a positive cathexis.
4. In immunology, the strength of interaction between an antigen binding site and an antigenic determinant.
5. A biomolecular interaction exhibiting specificity.
[L. affinis, neighboring, fr. ad, to, + finis, end, boundary]

affinity

/af·fin·i·ty/ (ah-fin´ĭ-te)
1. attraction; a tendency to seek out or unite with another object or substance.
2. in chemistry, the tendency of two substances to form strong or weak chemical bonds forming molecules or complexes.
3. in immunology, the thermodynamic bond strength of an antigen-antibody complex. Cf. avidity.

affinity

(ə-fĭn′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. affini·ties
a. An attraction or force between particles or chemicals that causes them to combine.
b. The degree to which particles or chemicals are likely to combine: Hemoglobin has a high affinity for oxygen. Also called avidity.

affinity

[əfin′itē]
Etymology: L, affinis, related
the measure of the binding strength of the antigen-antibody reaction.

Affinity

(1) An inherent relationship.
(2) A special attraction for a specific element, organ, or structure.
Chemistry
(1) The intensity of a force that binds atoms in molecules; the tendency of substances to combine by a chemical reaction.
(2) The strength of noncovalent binds between two substances, as measured by the dissociation constant of the complex.
(3) The reciprocal of the dissociation constant.
Developmental biology The degree to which one substance is attracted to another.
Immunology
(1) A thermodynamic expression of the strength of the interaction between a single antigen binding site and a single antigenic determinant (and thus of the stereochemical compatibility between them), most accurately applied to interactions among simple, uniform antigenic determinants such as haptens.
(2) The sum of the strengths of multiple binding sites between an antibody and an antigen, which increased stability of the linkage, as measured by the association or affinity constant.

af·fin·i·ty

(ă-fin'i-tē)
1. chemistry The force that impels certain atoms to unite with certain others.
2. Selective staining of a tissue by a dye.
3. The strength of binding between a Fab site of an antibody and an antigenic determinant.
4. In a general sense, an attraction.
[L. affinis, neighboring, fr. ad, to, + finis, end, boundary]

affinity

The strength of binding between a receptor, such as an ANTIGEN binding site on an antibody, and a LIGAND, such as an EPITOPE on an antigen.

affinity

  1. the relationship of one organism to another in terms of its evolution.
  2. the strength of binding between molecules, for example an ANTIBODY and an ANTIGEN.

affinity

1. attraction; a tendency to seek out or unite with another object or substance.
2. in chemistry, the tendency of two substances to form strong or weak chemical bonds forming molecules or complexes.
3. in immunology, the thermodynamic bond strength of an antigen-antibody complex.

antibody affinity
the strength of the binding interaction between antigen and antibody.
drug affinity
the attraction of a particular class of receptor to a drug, at a level sufficient to give an observable reaction. Such a drug is an agonist.
affinity maturation
the increased affinity of antibody for an antigen which occurs during the course of an immune response.
References in periodicals archive ?
Implementation of representative cross-sectional survey "The Drug Affinity young people in Germany 2015" with the following services to be provided by the contractor activities:
These drug-like fragments are ideal for pioneering therapeutic interventions that require high drug affinity and specificity, but do not require an immune effector response.
Underlying all ConjuChem compounds are bioconjugation platforms called Drug Affinity Complex (DAC[TM]) and Preformed Conjugate-Drug Affinity Complex (PC-DAC[TM]).

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