drug


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drug

(drŭg),
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease. For types or classifications of drugs, see the specific name.
See also: agent.
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
[M.E. drogge]

drug

(drug)
1. a chemical substance that affects the processes of the mind or body.
2. any chemical compound used in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of disease or other abnormal condition.
3. a substance used recreationally for its effects on the central nervous system, such as a narcotic.
4. to administer a drug to.

designer drug  a new drug of abuse similar in action to an older abused drug and usually created by making a small chemical modification in the older one.
mind-altering drug  one that produces an altered state of consciousness.
nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug  (NSAID) any of a large, chemically heterogeneous group of drugs that inhibit the enzyme cyclooxygenase, resulting in decreased synthesis of prostaglandin and thromboxane precursors; they have analgesic, antipyretic, and antiinflammatory actions.
orphan drug  one that has limited commercial appeal because of the rarity of the condition it is used to treat.
psychoactive drug , psychotropic drug see under substance.

drug

(drŭg)
n.
1.
a. A substance used in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a disease or as a component of a medication.
b. Such a substance as recognized or defined by the US Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.
2. A chemical substance, such as a narcotic or hallucinogen, that affects the central nervous system, causing changes in behavior and often addiction.
tr.v. drugged, drugging, drugs
a. To administer a drug to, especially to treat pain or induce anesthesia.
b. To give a drug to, especially surreptitiously, in order to induce stupor.

drug

Etymology: Fr, drogue
1 also called medicine, any substance taken by mouth; injected into a muscle, the skin, a blood vessel, or a cavity of the body; or applied topically to treat or prevent a disease or condition.
2 (informal) any substance that can be abused for its stimulant, depressant, euphoric, or hallucinogenic effects.

drug

(1) An article other than food that is intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease, or is intended to affect the structure or any function of the body. The term does not include a device, or a component, part or accessory of a device.
(2) A substance recognised by an official pharmacopia or formulary.

drug

NIHspeak Any chemical compound that may be used on or administered to humans to help diagnose, treat, cure, mitigate, or prevent disease or other abnormal conditions Regulatory definition An article or substance that is
1. Recognized by the US Pharmacopoeia, National Formulary, or official Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia, or supplement to any of the above.
2. Intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease in man or animals.
3. Intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or animals Substance abuse Any medication; the word drug also carries a negative connotation–implying abuse, addiction, or illicit use. See Alternative drug, Antithyroid drug, Antituberculosis drug, Blockbuster drug, Brake drug, Butterfly drug, Category X drug, Cholesterol-lowering drug, Club drug, Club of Rome drug, Crude drug, Designer drug, Disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, Door-to-drug, Free drug, Gateway drug, Generic drug, Group C drug, Hard drug, Immunomodulatory drug, INAD drug, Investigational drug, Legend drug, Me too drug, Lifestyle drug, Narrow therapeutic index drug, Natural drug, New drug, Non-legend drug, Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, Oligonucleotide drug, Orphan drug, Over-the-counter drug, Overseas mail-order drug, Performance enhancing drug, Pocket drug, Prescription drug, Probe drug, Prodrug, Pseudo-orphan drug, Psychoactive drug, Radioactive drug, Radiomimetic drug, Recreational drug, Second-line drug, Selective cytokine inhibitory drug, Soft drug, Treatment-investigational new drug, Wonder drug.

drug

(drŭg)
1. A therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent, medication
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying that an excessive quantity or a narcotic is involved.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.

drug

1. Any substance used as medication or for the diagnosis of disease.
2. A popular term for any narcotic or addictive substance.

drug

  1. any substance used as an ingredient in medical preparations.
  2. any substance that affects the normal body functions.

drug,

n nonfood physical material that alters an organism's normal func-tioning by affecting physiologic processes. Preferred homeopathic terminology is
medicine or
remedy rather than
drug.
drug abuse,
n use of a drug, whether over the counter or prescription, for purposes other than those prescribed on the product label, often for recreational reasons.
drug action,
n in homeopathy, consequence of the application of a homeo-pathic remedy in a living organism that is different from its potency at a biochemical level. See also autoregulation.
drug interactions,
n.pl negative (occasionally positive) health consequences arising from the ways in which drugs, herbs, medications, and nutritional supplements interact with each other when taken concurrently. Such interactions arguably represent the largest risk when taking multiple medications and/or supplements.
drug picture,
n a description of the symptoms resulting from a homeopathic remedy. These pictures can be found in the materia medica and result from provings when the remedy was given to healthy people. Also called
remedy picture.
drug, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory (nnˈ-steˑ·roi·dl anˈ·tī·in·flaˑ·m·tōr·ē drugˑ),
n a family of medications that reduce symptoms associated with inflammation, such as pain, swelling, and stiffness. It can also be used to treat other painful conditions like gout, tendonitis, bursitis, sprains, or menstrual cramps. Also called
NSAID.
drugs, antiviral (anˈ·tē·vīˑ·rl drugsˑ),
n.pl a class of drugs used to combat illnesses, such as HIV, that are caused by viruses.
drugs, standardization of,
n 1. in pharmacology, the establishment of consistent parameters for a given drug's synthesis, composition, action, and toxicity.
2. in homeopathy, the requirement that homeopathic remedy preparation be consistent with respect to content and manner of preparation.

drug

(drŭg)
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, which can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.

drug(s),

n a substance used in the prevention, cure, or alleviation of disease or pain or as an aid in some diagnostic procedures.
drug absorption,
drug abuse,
n an excessive or improper use of drugs, especially through self-administration for nonmedical purposes. This term has increased significance because of the enactment of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970, which replaces the Harrison Narcotic Act. See also substance abuse.
drug combinations,
n.pl the use of drugs together to enhance the properties of both to the benefit of the patient.
drug dependence,
n a physical or psychologic state in which a person displays withdrawal symptoms if drug use is halted suddenly; can lead to addiction.
Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA),
n.pr the federal agency charged with monitoring use and abuse of narcotics. It provides the drug schedules used to determine the addiction potential of dental drugs.
drug hypersensitivity,
n an allergic reaction that occurs after exposure to a suspect medication. It may manifest with a fever or rash and in severe cases, organ damage or death. It is classified as (1) immediate or occurring rapidly after exposure, or (2) delayed or occurring several days after exposure.
drug idiosyncrasy
n an adverse drug reaction that occurs in a small number of persons and presents no correlation to dosage or means of therapy.
drug interaction,
n a modification of the effect of a drug when administered with another drug. The effect may be an increase or a decrease in the action of either substance, or it may be an adverse effect that is not normally associated with either drug.
drug resistance,
n the capacity of a microorganism to build a tolerance to a drug.
drug stability,
n the length of time a drug retains its properties without loss of potency; usually referred to as shelf life.
drug therapy,
n the use of a drug in the treatment of a patient with a specific disease or illness.
drug tolerance,
n the body's ability to increasingly withstand the effects of the substance being used, thereby requiring larger quantities of said substance in order to bring about the desired result.
drug toxicity,
n the critical or lethal reaction to an erroneous dosage of a medication. Drug toxicity may occur due to human error or intentional overdose in the case of suicide or homicide.
drugs, antibiotic,
n.pl the chemical compounds obtained from certain living cells of lower plant forms, such as bacteria, yeasts, and molds, and from synthesis. They are antagonistic to certain pathogenic organisms and have a lethal effect on them.
drugs, antimicrobial,
n.pl the drugs, mainly penicillin and its derivatives, used to combat viral, fungal, and parasitic infections.
drugs, antiseptic,
n.pl the chemical compounds used to reduce the number of microorganisms in the oral cavity.
drugs, autonomic,
n.pl the drugs that mimic or block the effects of stimulation of the autonomic nervous system.
drugs, desensitizing,
n.pl the agents used to diminish or eliminate sensitivity of teeth, especially the dentin, to physical, chemical, thermal, or other irritants (e.g., strontium chloride, silver ammoniacal] or potassium nitrate, sodium fluoride, formalin, zinc chloride). See hypersensitivity, dentin.
drugs, endodontic,
n.pl the drugs used in treating the dental pulp and dental periapical tissues.
drugs, nonofficial,
n.pl the drugs that are not listed in the United States Pharmacopeia (U.S.P.) or the National Formulary (N.F.).
drugs, official,
n.pl the drugs listed in the U.S.P. or N.F.
drugs, officinal
n.pl drugs that may be purchased without a prescription. More commonly called
over-the-counter (OTC) drugs.
drugs, over-the-counter (OTC),
n.pl the drugs that may be purchased without a prescription. Sometimes called nonlegend drugs because the label does not bear the prescription legend required on all drugs that may be dispensed only on prescription.
drugs, parasympathetic
n.pl the belladonna alkaloids that inhibit glandular secretions of the nose, oral cavity, pharynx, and bronchi. This is the main reason for using atropine and scopolamine for preanesthetic or preprocedural medication.
drugs, parasympatholytic
(per´əsim´pəthōlit´ik),
n.pl the drugs that block nerve impulses passing from parasympathetic nerve fibers to postganglionic neuroeffectors.
drugs, parasympathomimetic
(per´əsim´pəthōmimet´ik),
n.pl the drugs that have an effect similar to that produced when the parasympathetic nerves are stimulated.
drugs, proprietary
(prəprī´iter´ē),
n.pl the drugs that are patented or controlled by a private organization or manufacturer.
drugs, psychoactive
n.pl the drugs or other agents that have the capacity to become habit forming because of their influence on mood, behavior, or conscious thought; may be therapeutic or recreational.
drugs, sympathetic,
n.pl the agents that imitate the sympathetic autonomic nervous system actions. They usually cause raised levels of alertness and anxiety. Various types are used in dentistry as vasoconstricters in conjunction with local anesthetics. See also adrenergic agents.

drug

1. any medicinal substance.
2. a narcotic.
3. to administer a drug.

drug administration
includes aerosol, oral, transtracheal infusion, subcutaneous, intramuscular, intravenous, intrauterine, intraperitoneal, intra-articular, intramammary, intrathecal, subconjunctival, percutaneous, percutaneous intraruminal, gas inhalation. Mass medication is per feed or drinking water or, in the case of captive fish, in the tank water. For feral animals individual dosing by projectile dart is usual, for group therapy administration by bait is possible.
drug allergy
immune-mediated hypersensitivity to a drug molecule. Includes anaphylaxis, cutaneous reaction.
animal drug
a drug specifically tested for, and recommended for use in, animals. A legal point of importance if an animal dies as a result of an unusual or allergic reaction to medication with a drug not licensed for use in animals.
drug augmented swine dysentery
pigs receiving prophylactic medication are more severely affected than untreated pigs.
bactericidal/bacteriostatic drug
drug binding
binding of a drug to a large molecule in the tissues or fluids, e.g. binding to protein in the blood, may affect the metabolism of the drug, especially its rate of excretion.
chemotherapeutic drug
drug combinations
a pharmaceutical strategy of combining several drugs into one formulation to provide for a specific requirement, e.g. an antibiotic combined with an anti-inflammatory agent in a mastitis ointment. Has the disadvantage that the dose of one drug is determined by the dose of the other.
controlled drug
availability and use of the drug is controlled by law. The control is at various levels of severity depending on the degree of danger associated with the uncontrolled use of each drug.
drug delayed swine dysentery
swine dysentery appears several days after treatment is discontinued.
drug delayed-augmented swine dysentery
after successful treatment during an attack of swine dysentery a more severe form of the disease occurs after treatment ceases.
drug diminished swine dysentery
the disease is reduced in severity as a result of treatment but is not eliminated.
drug eruption
an eruption or solitary skin lesion caused by a drug. See also dermatitis medicamentosa.
drug hypersensitivity
see drug allergy (above).
mutagenic d's
those that affect the DNA of the target organism have the hazard of creating new races of microorganisms with increased pathogenicity.
drug residue
the amount of the drug that can be detected in tissues at specified times after administration of the drug ceases. See also drug tolerance (below).
drug resistance
said mainly of antibacterial drugs and of microorganisms that are unaffected by the drug whilst most organisms of its species are susceptible. The resistance may be inherent or secondary to frequent exposure at sublethal levels. Resistance of an animal to a specific drug, e.g. to insulin, can also occur in this way.
drug resistant swine dysentery
medication of the feed is not an effective procedure and diarrhea and deaths occur.
drug safety margin
the magnitude of the difference between the dose required to produce a maximum therapeutic effect and that which produces a toxic effect. Registering authorities require this information.
drug selectivity
capacity to produce a single effect.
teratogenic drug
produces a toxic effect on the fetus at a particular phase of development producing a malformation.

Patient discussion about drug

Q. is it ok to use drugs for medical reasons? and who is to decide when is necessary to use drugs when needed?

A. Today the most used "medical" drugs are narcotics- for pain relief, for patients who suffer extreme pain. All sorts of Codaine and Morphine types are used and on a very wide basis, and they are specially perscribed for ones who need them.

Q. How about Psychiatric Drugs for bipolar? One of my friend is suffering from bipolar. Will Psychiatric medications help him to come out of this affect?

A. from what i read- there are certain medication that can help. if the first one doesn't - there is a second and third line of medication. from a personal experience (not mine, a friend of the family) it can even save your friend's life..

Q. What medications are forbidden to take with alcohol? And why is that?

A. I think this web page will give you something to think about:
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa27.htm
apparently there are more drugs you shouldn’t mix with alcohol then I could think of…

More discussions about drug
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the women who had not taken nevirapine, the drug regimen benefited two out of three by suppressing viral activity for at least 6 months.
Another lesson learned was that the less drug resistance is studied and the earlier the drug is in put into clinical development, the better the drug looks.
The HMO filed an unprecedented "citizen's petition" with the FDA to force the drug into over-the-counter status, in a move that could have saved the health care system $2 billion.
Also included in Tier A of the EMEA protocol is the long-term testing of fish, Daphnia (water fleas), and algae to assess the predicted "no effect" concentration (PNEC) of the new drug for each of these species.
Sunflower Pharma Obtains Patent for Pediatric Drug 76
A 2004 online survey conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of the California HealthCare Foundation revealed that consumer reactions to increasing drug costs should also be a major concern for plan sponsors.
Data come from research conducted as part of a project to develop technical assistance materials (Ellickson, Watkins, Vaiana, & Hiromoto, 2005) for Project ALERT, a drug education and prevention curriculum that has been nationally recognized as an exemplary school-based drug education program (BEST Foundation for a Drug Free Tomorrow, 2005).
As vice president of Drug Testing Services at Aurico Reports, Wayne Hovland runs into the same problem every time his drug screening company contacts institutions of higher education.
In the third global drug resistance surveillance report, the median prevalence of multidrug resistance was 7.
Another reason is that abusers may mistakenly believe that prescription drugs, because they come from a pharmacy and not a drug dealer, are safer to take, even at high doses or without a prescription.
Condition branding was soon being used by other drug makers to sell everything from high-cholesterol medications to Viagra.