drowning


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Related to drowning: Near drowning

drowning

 [drown´ing]
death from suffocation resulting from aspiration of water or other substance or fluid. Drowning occurs because the liquid prevents breathing. The lungs of a drowned person may contain very little water or other liquid.

First aid measures are begun as soon as the individual is rescued from the water. Blankets and other coverings are used only to prevent loss of body heat. artificial respiration or other appropriate respiratory support should be administered at once to anyone who has stopped breathing. A victim who is unconscious but still breathing should be placed in a reclining position, preferably on the side. If the victim is not breathing and there is no evidence of a heart beat, cardiopulmonary resuscitation is begun immediately.

drown·ing

(drown'ing), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation drownding.
Death within 24 hours of immersion in liquid, either due to anoxia or cardiac arrest caused by sudden extreme lowering of temperature (immersion syndrome).
See also: near drowning.

drowning

/drown·ing/ (droun´ing) suffocation and death resulting from filling of the lungs with water or other substance.

drowning

Etymology: ME, drounen
asphyxiation caused by submersion in a liquid. See also near drowning.
Death from asphyxia caused by a liquid entering the lungs and preventing the absorption of oxygen leading to cerebral hypoxia and cardiac arrest
Epidemiology Drowning claims 7,000 lives/year (US), comprising 15% of non-MVA deaths; 90% of decedents were hypoxic
Management The ‘standard’ ABCs of CPR are recommended, accompanied by intubation, placement of an IV line, if necessary, and use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), treatment of hyperthermia; the abdominal thrust maneuver—see there—is no longer recommended for routine use
Prognosis The main priority in near-drowning is to prevent brain injury; parameters that adversely influence ‘intact’ survival include delays in initiating CPR, severe metabolic acidosis—pH < 7.1—asystole on arrival to the hospital, fixed and dilated pupils, and a low—< 5—Glasgow score

drowning

Public health A mechanism of death that claims 7000 lives/yr–US, comprising 15% of non-MVA deaths; death is by asphyxia due to submersion, with aspiration of fluid; 90% of decedents were hypoxic. See Fresh water drowning, Salt water drowning, Wet drowning.
Drowning
Fresh water drowning Hypoosmolar water affects the surface tension of alveolar surfactant, causing an imbalance in the V/Q ratio with a collapse of some alveoli, resulting in both true (absolute) and relative intrapulmonary shunting; the V/Q abnormality is further compromised by pulmonary edema; the shifts of fluids and electrolytes in fresh water drowning result in hemodilution, hemolysis, circulatory overload, and hyponatremia
Salt water drowning Sea water aspiration results in fluid-filled but perfused alveoli, accompanied by a V/Q abnormality due to pulmonary edema; the shifts of fluids and electrolytes in salt water drowning result in hemoconcentration, CHF, and hypernatremia

drown·ing

(drow'ning)
Death from suffocation induced by immersion in water or other fluid, with filling of pulmonary air spaces and passages with fluid to the detriment of gas exchange.
[M.E. drounen]

drowning

Death from suffocation as a result of exclusion of air from the lungs by fluid, usually water. This may result from fluid produced within the lungs themselves (pulmonary oedema).

drown·ing

(drow'ning)
Death within 24 hours of immersion in liquid, either due to anoxia or cardiac arrest.
[M.E. drounen]

drowning,

n asphyxiation because of submersion in a liquid.

drowning

death from suffocation resulting from aspiration of water or other substance or fluid. Drowning occurs because the liquid prevents breathing.

dry-drowning
asphyxiation, but with little or no inhalation of water as a result of persistent laryngospasm.
near-drowning
secondary drowning
pulmonary edema may occur some time after a near-drowning due to loss of surfactant.
References in classic literature ?
Wave after wave thus leaps into the ship, and finding no speedy vent runs roaring fore and aft, till the mariners come nigh to drowning while yet afloat.
Whether sea-going people were short of money about that time, or were short of faith and preferred cork jackets, I don't know; all I know is, that there was but one solitary bidding, and that was from an attorney connected with the bill-broking business, who offered two pounds in cash, and the balance in sherry, but declined to be guaranteed from drowning on any higher bargain.
The naked Saxon serf was drowning the sense of his half-year's hunger and thirst, in one day of gluttony and drunkenness the more pampered burgess and guild-brother was eating his morsel with gust, or curiously criticising the quantity of the malt and the skill of the brewer.
For it was he; and, instead of drowning me, as was certainly his first intention, he swam with me and laid me gently on the bank:
But Alan was not sober; he had lost a thousand pounds upon a horse- race, had received the news at dinner-time, and was now, in default of any possible means of extrication, drowning the memory of his predicament.
And then I seemed sinking into deep green water, and there was a singing in my ears, as I have heard there is to drowning men, and then everything seemed passing away from me.
I had even a certain wish to encounter Moreau face to face; and as I had waded into the water, I remembered that if I were too hard pressed at least one path of escape from torment still lay open to me,--they could not very well prevent my drowning myself.
It will give you an idea, therefore, of the strange deficiency in these creatures, when I tell you that none made the slightest attempt to rescue the weakly crying little thing which was drowning before their eyes.
His death by drowning gave rise to the great Dragon-boat Festival, which was originally a solemn annual search for the body of the poet.
the first person I meet in the street is bound to be my second, just as he would be bound to pull a drowning man out of water.
Morrel, to aid Dantes, he had shut himself up with two bottles of black currant brandy, in the hope of drowning reflection.
In spite of all this, however, he did not lose sight of his raft, but swam as fast as he could towards it, got hold of it, and climbed on board again so as to escape drowning.