drop foot


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foot·drop

(fut'drop),
Partial or total inability to dorsiflex the foot, as a consequence of which the toes drag on the ground during walking unless a steppage gait is used; most often ultimately due to weakness of the dorsiflexor muscles of the foot (especially the tibialis anterior), but has many causes, including disorders of the peripheral and central nervous systems, motor unit, tendons, and bones.

drop foot

See footdrop.

drop foot

See FOOT DROP.
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References in periodicals archive ?
NeuroN represents the first systematic attempt to investigate the neurophysiological correlates of changes in the excitability of the cortical areas responsible for ankle dorsiflexion in chronic hemiparetic stroke survivors with drop foot impairment and to identify novel biomarkers of motor recovery.
The L300 is used as a primary medical device to address drop foot for individuals in the community and is also used for gait rehabilitation in inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation settings to potentially realize a variety of clinical benefits including improved mobility, maintaining or increasing range of motion, reeducating muscles, the prevention or slowing of muscle loss, and increased local blood flow.
I would strongly recommend you not try to manage drop foot yourself.
I had a drop foot, which meant I had to pick up my knee really high and I kept falling over.
R]] stimulates a patient's nervous system and is implanted surgically into the leg to combat the debilitating condition of drop foot.
Treatment of drop foot using an implantable peroneal underknee stimulator.
I have drop foot - you think your foot is lifting up to take another step but it's not.
US forces had to air drop foot and water aid to the embattled unit, which was threatening to surrender.
Less noticeable dysfunction associated with drop foot includes paresis of foot eversion and sensory impairment on the dorsum of the foot and lateral leg.
The costume includes glasses that simulate vision loss, a tight belt that reproduces the "MS hug," thick gloves that mimic finger numbness, and ankle weights, a high heel, and a flipper to acquaint the wearer with drop foot and balance issues.
The surgeon told me there was a one in 100 chance that I'd suffer drop foot after the operation - it's a complication that prevents the patient from raising the foot at the ankle.