drop foot

foot·drop

(fut'drop),
Partial or total inability to dorsiflex the foot, as a consequence of which the toes drag on the ground during walking unless a steppage gait is used; most often ultimately due to weakness of the dorsiflexor muscles of the foot (especially the tibialis anterior), but has many causes, including disorders of the peripheral and central nervous systems, motor unit, tendons, and bones.

drop foot

See footdrop.

drop foot

See FOOT DROP.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Herein, we report a case of postherpetic paresis and drop foot as an unusual complication in whom late clinical signs suggested previously undiagnosed diabetes mellitus.
I haven't worn it for seven years and still have good movement of my foot with no sign of a drop foot.
A 69-year-old female presented with a chief compliant of right lower lateral leg aching with a drop foot.
I would strongly recommend you not try to manage drop foot yourself.
5] Bourrel, Bourges and Tourze (1967) reported twenty-three cases of drop foot (18 caused by leprosy), in which they had done dual transfer of the tendons of the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus.
Tommy ended up with long-term medical problems because of the damage done to his body - including sciatic nerve damage, drop foot with no feeling below the knee and osteoporosis.
Surgical restoration of drop foot deformity with tibialis posterior tendon transfer.
NeuroN represents the first systematic attempt to investigate the neurophysiological correlates of changes in the excitability of the cortical areas responsible for ankle dorsiflexion in chronic hemiparetic stroke survivors with drop foot impairment and to identify novel biomarkers of motor recovery.
Dean took over the company after developing drop foot, a condition that makes it difficult to lift the front part of the foot, and learning to ride an adapted trike with hand controls.
There were lagophthalmos (n=23) ulnar nerve thickening (n=34) sensory loss in glove and stocking pattern in 36 patients drop hand (n=1) drop foot (n=1) but deep tendon reflexes were preserved in 40 pa- tients.
99) is designed to help people with peripheral neuropathy and other nerve impairments, such as drop foot, regain confidence in their walk.