drifts


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drifts

(drifts),
Slow ocular movements of greater amplitude than flicks, occurring during ocular fixation.
Synonym(s): drift movements
References in classic literature ?
The village lay under two feet of snow, with drifts at the windy corners.
The iceberg drifts slowly--over the black water; through the ashy light.
As he sank down among them the clouds ceased to seem the snowclad mountain-slopes they had resembled heretofore, became unsubstantial, confessed an immense silent drift and eddy in their substance.
I -- want -- you -- to -- get -- into -- the -- nest," the bird called, speaking as slowly and distinctly as possible, "and -- then -- you -- can -- drift -- ashore, but -- I -- am -- too -- tired -- to -- bring -- it -- any -- nearer -- so -- you -- must -- try -- to -- swim -- to -- it.
They clung to this anchorage until the water resumed its proper direction, when they allowed the raft to drift on.
After Jane Clayton, with rifle levelled at the breast of Rokoff, had succeeded in holding him off until the dugout in which she had taken refuge had drifted out upon the bosom of the Ugambi beyond the man's reach, she had lost no time in paddling to the swiftest sweep of the channel, nor did she for long days and weary nights cease to hold her craft to the most rapidly moving part of the river, except when during the hottest hours of the day she had been wont to drift as the current would take her, lying prone in the bottom of the canoe, her face sheltered from the sun with a great palm leaf.
There was nothing for it but to risk all on a bold bid for fortune, or drift helplessly past without hope of returning through the banth-infested valley, from many points of which he could now hear the roars and growls of these fierce Barsoomian lions.
But ahead of them was a lane with houses on either side, so evidently the snow had been blown across the road and they had to drive through the drift.
The girls had discovered that if the flat were pushed off from the landing place it would drift down with the current under the bridge and finally strand itself on another headland lower down which ran out at a curve in the pond.
But the boat was not fastened, and the motion which she occasioned, made it drift from the shore.
Zarathustra's habit of designating a whole class of men or a whole school of thought by a single fitting nickname may perhaps lead to a little confusion at first; but, as a rule, when the general drift of his arguments is grasped, it requires but a slight effort of the imagination to discover whom he is referring to.
My lady's horror of him might (as I have since thought) have meant that she saw his drift (as the scripture says) "in a glass darkly.