drawer sign


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draw·er sign

in a knee examination, the forward or backward sliding of the tibia under applied stress, which indicates laxity or tear of the anterior (forward slide) or posterior (backward slide) cruciate ligament of the knee.
Synonym(s): drawer test

drawer sign

Etymology: AS, dragan, to drag
a diagnostic sign of a ruptured or torn anterior cruciate or posterior cruciate ligament of the knee. Testing involves having the patient flex the knee at a right angle while the lower leg is grasped just below the knee and moved first toward, then away from the examiner. The test result is positive for the knee injury if the head of the tibia can be moved more than a half inch from the joint. See also anterior drawer sign or test.
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Drawer test

drawer sign

Orthopedics A clinical finding characterized by forward sliding–caused by disruption of the anterior cruciate ligament or backward sliding–posterior cruciate of the tibia

draw·er sign

(drōr sīn)
In a knee examination, abnormal forward or backward sliding of the tibia with respect to the femur indicating laxity or tear of the anterior (forward slide) or posterior (backward slide) cruciate ligament of the knee.
Synonym(s): drawer test.

Rocher,

Henri Gaston Louis, French surgeon, 1876–.
Rocher sign - the forward or backward sliding of the tibia indicating laxity or tear of the anterior or posterior cruciate ligaments of the knee. Synonym(s): drawer sign
The anterior drawer test.

drawer sign

a clinical sign that describes the movement of the tibia relative to the femur and is positive if the relevant cruciate ligament is torn. The cruciates provide the primary stability of the knee joint. Disruption of the anterior cruciate will allow excess anterior movement of the tibia relative to the femur and posterior movement is a sign of posterior cruciate damage. For the anterior drawer test, with the subject's knee flexed to 90°, the hamstrings relaxed and the foot stabilized, the examiner firmly grasps the leg below the knee and pulls it so as to move the tibia forward; for the posterior drawer test, with the knee flexed to 80° and the foot stabilized, the examiner attempts to move the tibia backwards. Excessive movement, compared to the other knee, indicates rupture of the ligament. See also knee injury.

drawer sign

see anterior (cranial) drawer sign.