doubling time


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doubling time

the time it takes for the number of cells in a neoplasm to double, with shorter doubling times implying more rapid growth.
Experimental biology The time necessary for a zygote or cells in culture to increase two-fold; the doubling time is usually longer than the average generation time of the individual cells of the population as there are growth constraints on the population—e.g., nutritional, senescence, death
Oncology A parameter used to determine tumour aggressiveness, which serves to prognosticate, measure therapeutic success, and quantify tumour kinetics and growth rate

doubling time

Oncology A parameter used to determine tumor aggressiveness, which serves to prognosticate, measure therapeutic success, and quantify tumor kinetics and growth rate. Cf Gompertzian growth curve.

doub·ling time

(dŭb'ling tīm)
The time it takes for the number of cells in a neoplasm to double, with shorter doubling times implying more rapid growth.

doubling time

or

generation time

(in microbiology) the time in which the number of cells in a population doubles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Trock said prostate cancer-specific survival at 10 years was 82% with salvage therapy and 30% without salvage therapy for those with a PSA doubling time of less than 6 months.
4 months in those who had minimal or no pain at baseline and whose PSA doubling time was at least 45 days.
Barken is also questioning the hypothesis that genistein is the only effective agent in soy responsible for the slowing of PSA doubling time.
A subset of these 50,000 men will have rapid PSA doubling times, and will die as a result of biochemical failure.
While more study is needed and a new study is being planned for this fall, this is the first study done in humans that shows fermented soy drink helps early relapse prostate cancer patients by slowing their Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) doubling time.
Urologists interviewed by Decision Resources say that elucidation of the relevance of PSA velocity and PSA doubling time may result in a larger number of PSA tests being performed; although only one PSA test (followed by biopsy) is necessary for a diagnosis of prostate cancer, measuring PSA velocity to determine aggressiveness requires that at least two tests be undertaken, therefore doubling market opportunity for PSA screens.
1) Again, PSA doubling time increased, from 15 months at baseline to 60 months at follow-up.
Those men whose testing during the surveillance period revealed a PSA doubling time of 3 years or less and/or grade progression on rebiopsy to a Gleason score of 7 or higher, as well as those who chose not to continue on active surveillance, were offered radical intervention.
Clinically, vaccination was associated with a statistically significant increase in PSA doubling time and clearance of prostate cancer cells from the patients' blood.
In addition, telomerase specific T-cell responses were generated in 19 of 20 subjects and vaccination was associated with a statistically significant increase in PSA doubling time and clearance of prostate cancer cells from the patients' blood, indicative of potential clinical response.