dorsiflexor

dorsiflexor

[dôr′siflek′sər]
a muscle causing backward flexion of a part of the body, as the hand or foot.
References in periodicals archive ?
Field-Fote and Roach found that overground training combined with functional electrical stimulation (FES) to the ankle dorsiflexor muscles was superior to BWSTT, BWSTT with FES, and robot (Lokomat)-assisted treadmill training [16].
Lower limb motor strength examination revealed that bilateral hip flexor and knee extensor strength was 3/5, ankle dorsiflexor strength was 4/5, bilateral toe dorsiflexor strength was 3/5, extensor digitorum brevis muscle strength was 3/5, and ankle plantar flexor strength was 5/5.
Different functions place different demands on different muscles; for instance the strength of the dorsiflexor and hip flexor muscles strongly correlates with walking speed and endurance in people after stroke (Dorsch et al 2012), whilst the strength of the hip extensors, flexors and knee extensors are important for successful performance of stair climbing (Bohannon and Walsh 1991).
1) Often associated with common peroneal nerve (CPN) dysfunction, it is caused by paresis of the ankle dorsiflexor, the tibialis anterior, and the toe dorsiflexors, the extensor digitorum brevis and extensor hallucis longus.
This modality has proven to be highly successful in cases of chronic plantar fasciitis, in conjunction with the standard modalities such as stretching exercises, Dorsiflexor night splints, weight loss, and orthotics.
By acting as a substitute for dorsiflexor muscles, the brace holds the foot and ankle in position through the important swing phase of gait.
The ankle dorsiflexor (tibialis anterior) muscle was targeted to counterbalance the plantar flexor contractures during standing that were common for subject J.
Similarly the ankle plantar flexor and dorsiflexor exercises using body weight as resistance for 2 sets of 10 repetitions may not be sufficient overload for an individual.
Ankle dorsiflexor strength was within normal limits as was testing of the proximal lower extremity muscle groups.
When high frequency vibrations (150 Hz) were applied over the tendons of ankle dorsiflexor muscles, Bongiovanni and Hagbarth (1990) reported that the firing frequency in non-fatigued muscle did not change; but the vibration caused an increase in force, EMG and firing frequency during fatiguing isometric maximal voluntary contractions (Table 3).
Reliability of isokinetic ankle dorsiflexor strength measurements in healthy young men and women.