dorsal column


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dorsal column

dorsal column

The triangular (in cross-section) sector of white matter demarcated by the dorsal midline (the dorsal median sulcus) and the dorsal horn on each side of the spinal cord. The dorsal column is a large bundle of ipsilateral primary sensory axons.
Synonym: dorsal funiculus; posterior column 2
See also: column

column

an anatomical part in the form of a pillar-like structure; anything resembling a pillar.

anal c's
longitudinal folds of mucous membrane at the cranial half of the anal canal; called also rectal columns.
column of Bertin
extensions of renal cortex between the renal pyramids.
column chromatography
dorsal column
the dorsal portion of the gray substance of the spinal cord, in transverse section seen as a horn.
gray column
the longitudinally oriented parts of the spinal cord in which the nerve cell bodies are found, comprising the gray matter of the spinal cord.
lateral column
the lateral portion of the gray substance of the spinal cord, in transverse section seen as a horn; present only in the thoracic and anterior lumbar regions.
rectal c's
anal columns.
spinal column
the rigid structure in the midline of the back, composed of the vertebrae. Called also vertebral column. See also spine.
ventral column
the ventral portion of the gray substance of the spinal cord, in transverse section seen as a horn.
References in periodicals archive ?
Five years ago, however, the Galveston researchers uncovered evidence that the bulk of the pain from the internal organs, or viscera, travels up the overlooked dorsal column, while the spinothalamic tract carries pain messages predominantly from the skin and muscles.
Sparing of the dorsal columns was evident from preservation of deep touch, proprioception and vibration sense in all limbs.
12] deficiency are 1) Hematologic: megaloblastic anemia and pancytopenia (leucopenia, thrombocytopenia); 2) Neurologic: paresthesias, peripheral neuropathy, and combined systems disease (demyelination of dorsal columns and corticospinal tract); 3) Psychiatric: irritability; personality change; mild memory impairment, dementia; depression; and psychosis; and 4) Cardiovascular: possible increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke.
Damage to the dorsal columns results in contralateral loss of proprioception and fine touch below the level of the lesion.

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