dormancy


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dormancy

(dor′măn-sē)
Temporary inactivity; e.g., a state of transiently reduced metabolic activity.
dormant, adjective

dormancy

a state in which seeds and other structures (such as underground stems) reduce their metabolic activities to a minimum level during unfavourable conditions (e.g. low temperature, drought) so as to survive until conditions improve. In fungal spores dormancy can be EXOGENOUS, requiring an external stimulus (e.g. presence of nutrients) for germination; or ENDOGENOUS, where dormancy is controlled by an innate property of the spore and is unaffected by the ambient environment when in this state. See GERMINATION for events that occur when seed dormancy is broken.
References in periodicals archive ?
Apart from these simple theoretical considerations, direct evidence delineating whether or not dormancy contributes to seed persistence in alpine regions is scarce.
Orchard owners should closely monitor the situation with regard to supply of micronutrient, water, control of pests besides frosty weather conditions to avoid disturbance to dormancy.
When considering products for duty in low-ambient temperatures, users must ask prospective suppliers the difficult questions about performance issues, such as flexibility and dormancy.
A period of three to four months at cold temperatures is probably required for embryo growth and the breaking of dormancy.
Indeed, there is evidence suggesting that tumor dormancy is a valid target for therapy.
But they should first be exposed to low temperatures to break their dormancy, this best achieved by exposing the roots to frost.
In order to break dormancy and resume growth, the trees must receive a certain amount of winter chilling hours between 32-45[degrees]F.
Those ward republics do actually exist, though in various degrees of dormancy.
A comprehensive work dealing with laboratory and field methods for breaking dormancy of 23 species of weed seeds is reported by Everson (1949).